Exterior Color Schemes: European Roof Reccomendations

A roof is typically not a focal point of a home, but with DaVinci European roof tiles, it may steal the show. European slate style roof offers multiple shades of colors rooted in black and gray, accented with deep reddish-purple tones. These make choosing a main exterior color simple.

But even when you are starting with a gorgeous roof it is still a big decision to choose the exact color scheme for your home exterior. Have no fear. I'm here to help you. Rather than start with hundreds of potential colors and unlimited color combinations. I've put together five of my favorite combinations based on the many hundreds of homeowners I have helped by using my "top down" approach for selecting exterior colors.

You can use one of these schemes exactly or it can be the inspiration for creating your own perfect scheme.

Simple White

White is an age-old color known for its simple nature in home design. Black shutters are the perfect accent to anchor the home. The varied tones in the European roof tiles add interest to a white home without taking away from the classic appeal.

 

Functional Gray

When in doubt, turn to warm gray. This color is a safe, neutral tone that delivers every time. The monochromatic paint on the home allows for excitement using a bold gray and dark red accent color. These tones are repeated in the European roof tiles giveing the home a cohesive look and unending curb appeal.

 

Sausalito

The color yellow embodies happiness and is reminiscent of sunny days. A soft creamy yellow with tan trim sits brightly under a slate roof. The door color is perfectly agreeable with the homes’ main color using a soft gray with lavender undertones.

 

Cameo White

The beauty of the European color is that it adds dimension to a homes exterior no matter what shape or size the roof. The blend of black, grays and red tones allow for similar accent colors. This paint palette combines an off-white color for the main color with gray accents. Add flair with a toned down maroon front door for a twist on a traditional white home.

 

Black
In home design, the color black is making a comeback. Homeowners, once timid to use such a dramatic color, are now braving the tone on all sorts of homes. The minimalistic color is an easy choice when DaVinci European toned tiles line the roof. Several shades of gray and deep reddish-purple shine through the European tile. The deep hue on the homes’ exterior creates an amplified focus on all surrounding architecture.

 

See what your home would look like with a DaVinci roof in Slate Black or one of 49 nature-inspired colors using the Top Down Color™ Visualizer.

 

**The paint colors used in this article are from Behr, Benjamin Moore, PPG Paints, and Sherwin-Williams. To find out more about any color shown, search online using the color name and number.

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Exterior Color Schemes: Mountain Roof Recommendations

Home on the range is tall on style with the feature roof color Mountain. A westward journey of color scaling monstrous mountains, creeks, and streams in the wilderness bring an earthy hue to any rooftop.

Homes vary by region but DaVinci’s Mountain color clearly fits the timberline build as well as homes in a wide variety of locations and styles. Choosing an exterior color scheme for your home with this rich grayed brown is easy because it goes well with so, so many colors. What makes it difficult is deciding which color scheme you like best for your home from what seems like an infinite number of color combinations.

When creating an exterior color palette, I use my "top down" approach to help me narrow down the choices. I start by looking at the color of the roof. From there, I follow my FRESH steps to choose each color. To help you find the right color scheme, I have selected five fabulous exterior color palettes for homes with DaVinci Shake in the color Mountain. You can use one of these color schemes exactly or use them to inspire you to create one of your own.

 

shake

Northwood Brown

The home pictured uses the natural elements of wood and stone. A monochromatic scheme using a medium brown mixed with tan, and light cream keep the focus on these natural textures not distract with bold paint.

 

shake tile roof

Tree Moss

Trouble finding the perfect color? Let nature be your guide and go green. Envision a forest filled with various species of trees some light some dark, but all in a similar color family. This is exactly how light green, a deeper muted green and brown work together. DaVinci Mountain roofing tops it off - literally, with a multi-toned roof tile to compliment these gray greens. Utilizing contrast is still an option by painting or staining a dark brown door color.

 

composite slate roofing

Goldtone

Yellow is a color that gives your home for a sunny and fun personality. Golden yellow and brown are perfect partners. Mountain roof tile on top of the gold tone paint gives a upbeat welcoming tone without drawing away from the natural surroundings. Bright yellow would call too much attention and is best reserved for more tropical settings. The brown, almost purple accent color compliments the main color beautifully. On the front door this color rich in brown from a distance will illuminate with purple undertones up close.

 

Shake Roof

Origami White

In home design, white often shows classic and timeless style. Homeowners seem to either love or hate white. For those who love white, its best to go with a contrasting door color. Painting the door darker than the deepest color of the Mountain color on the roof is a great way to add contrast and depth to the home.

 

shake roof tile

Glazed Pear

Many historic properties contain a similar color palette due to naturally occurring colors. A muted color can sometimes be more powerful in framing a property or landscape. The cream exterior color is simple when paired with off-white trim. The pale brown accent can detail windows. Dark brown would cover the door while coordinating tones with the Mountain roof.

See what your home would look like with a DaVinci Shake roof in Mountain or one of 49 nature-inspired colors using the Top Down Color™ Visualizer.

 

 

**The paint colors used in this article are from Behr, Benjamin Moore, PPG Paints, and Sherwin-Williams. To find out more about any color shown, search online using the color name and number.

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Exterior Color Schemes: Slate Gray Roof Recommendations

Choosing a color scheme for your home exterior? If you are feeling both excited and overwhelmed, you are not alone. You may be thrilled about updating the look of your home. At the same time, you may be inundated with the hundreds of colors and an infinite number of color combinations.

I understand. Over the years, with my help, hundreds of homeowners have gone from feeling paralyzed by the number of choices to confidently selecting their colors. Now I want to help you have that same feeling of satisfaction that comes with creating a beautiful home exterior.

When creating an exterior color palette, I always use my "top down" approach, which starts by looking at the color of the roof. From there, I follow my FRESH steps to choose each color. To save you the time, I have selected five fabulous exterior color palettes for each of the top roofing colors. This can shortcut the process and give you an exact color scheme to use or inspire you to create one of your own much more quickly.

The most popular choice for roofing is gray. It is also trending as a top choice of for exterior paint color, too. So for my first post, I will give you my Slate Gray roof recommendations. Look for other colors in my post that follow.

Orange Maple

The boldness of a main exterior color, such as orange, will be tamed by a slate gray roof. Gray acts as a neutral creating unified curb appeal. The gray shutters also help to make a connection between the roof and the color on the house.

top down color

 

Bone Black

A gray exterior can feel calm and cool. The vibrant yellow front door keeps the look from feeling too sedate. The dark gray accent provides depth while the off-white trim is a healthy contrast to the gray.

exterior color

 

Agreeable Gray

Pale gray and blue become grounded by the Slate Gray tone in roofing. The subtle hint of brown in the main exterior paint color is easily complimented by blue and more pronounced when set next to the Slate Gray roof.

home exterior color combo

 

Smoke Embers

Play up the cool tones of gray with a blue, green or teal accent color. These cool tones give the gray an edgy flare perfect for understated design. Slate Gray roofing is a natural pairing with any blue tones.

home exterior color

 

Chelsea Gray

Gray on green is fun to pronounce, but even more fun to paint. The trio of light, medium and dark gray keep the exterior of the home interesting while providing variety at the same time.

 

Do more than just dream, visualize. See what your home would look like with a DaVinci Slate roof in Slate Gray or one of 49 nature-inspired colors using the Top Down Color™ Visualizer.

 

 

**The paint colors used in this article are from Behr, Benjamin Moore, PPG Paints, and Sherwin-Williams. To find out more about any color shown, search online using the color name and number.

 

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Color Inspiration From The Top Down

Replacing a roof is often the first step in updating your home's exterior. If so, then the roof will set the direction for many other design decisions. It is worth taking the time to select a style and color that both you and your home will love for a long time.

Know What You Like And What You Don't Like

Look around at other homes to see what builders and homeowners have selected for houses similar to your own. Make note of the style, colors, and materials. Does the overall look of the home appeal to you? Do you love the shake roof with cream trim against dark siding? Perhaps a gray state above a traditional black and white exterior speaks to your sense classic design and timeless design.

The more you can see looks you like on homes that are similar to your own, the easier it becomes to imagine a new look for your own home. It is easy to snap pictures of the color schemes and materials you like and maybe even some you don't to remind you to make sure you don't make the same mistakes.

Start With Your Roof For A Fabulous Exterior Top To Bottom

Innovative roofing materials allow you to add the beauty and dimension of traditional slate or shake and the easy care, long-life and resilience of a beautifully engineered product. You can also find exactly the right color and know that it will stay that color for the life of the roof.

Gray continues to be a favorite for slate and why not. It goes with every scheme. With a variety of shades of gray available you are sure to find the perfect gray for your home. Check out our Best 50 Shades Of Gray Infographic.

For shake, Tahoe, Mountain and Autumn are all favorites. When you have a shake roof tones of warm brown are a natural choice.

Today's architects, designers and even homeowners are posting images of their completed home exteriors online so in addition to scoping out houses in your local area you can find home from just about anywhere. Check out Houzz or This Old House or even our own gallery.

Please keep in mind, however, that some home colors work better in particular regions than the same color does in other areas. For example, bright colors that are a hit in southern Florida might not fare as well in a Philadelphia suburb. 

Last, always keep in mind that while you want your home to have your personal stamp on it you also want it to fit into your neighborhood. I know I've created a great exterior design when the homeowners love the home and it stands out for its great design while still fitting in with the surroundings. 

One sure fire way to create a home exterior that fits in anywhere is to find colors that blend with your natural surroundings. One of nature's neutrals mixed with natural materials like stone and DaVinci Slate or Shake and you begin to forget where your home ends and the natural surroundings begin. Is it any wonder that nature-based colors are by far the most popular for home exteriors?

For help with choosing your exterior colors visit our color studio and try the color tool or download our FRESH Home Exterior Colors Guides.

 

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Color Trends: Three Tips For Using This Year's Hottest Hues

Trend forecasters discover trends before they are apparent to most people. These are the people who set the trends into motion when they make their best guess as to which color and design elements the market will want to buy in the future. 

Yes, you read that right. They guess. Trend forecasters are always guessing. They look at mega, macro and micro trends and then couple their findings with their in-depth knowledge of an industry or market.

A successful trend forecaster has the ability to weigh current information against what they have learned from years of experience and not only predict future directions for color and design but also give solid justifications for why these are the trend directions. In other words, the best trend forecasters are those who are pretty darn good at guessing correctly.

But you don't need to be a professional forecaster to discover upcoming trends. Rather than forecasting the trends you can find trends ahead of the curve by spotting them as they just begin to hit the market. This is known as trendspotting and is actually what the vast majority of people that talk about trends are doing.

For many years trend forecasting was a big part of my job. Today, I don't spend nearly as much time focused on trends as I once did. These days, I am more of a trend spotter, and with 2017 quickly approaching I am sharing three of my favorite tips so that you can try your hand at trendspotting, too.

Tip #1 Know the difference between a fad and a trend

You Find a FAD
People often refer to fads and trends as if they are one and the same. This is not the case. There is a difference between a fad and a trend.

A fad is a here-today-gone-tomorrow color, design or style. Fads rise fast. They seem to explode onto the scene out of nowhere. They are often mainly popular at first with a particular age group or type of person and then grow from there. Remember Day-Glo colors, anyone?

Fads are fun and create followers. They are relatively short lived and fade from the mainstream within two years or less. Still they are often long remembered after they are gone because so many people shared the experience of the fad even if they didn’t participate in it. 

You track a TREND
A trend comes about as a result of myriad cultural, political, social and economic factors that interact to influence our preferences. Trends respond to human needs and emotions. Trends become trends because they address an unspoken need or desire that many people share at a particular time.

Currently looking to our lineage gives us feelings of strength and stability. Out of this comes the trend of reinventing classic and historical designs rather seeking something completely new. This also signals that the trend of placing importance on neutrals for for both home interiors and exteriors will continue.

People notice trends slowly and are usually unaware of a trend at first. As it becomes more prevalent, it crosses into different groups of people, expands into more geographical areas and types of products, which is how it gains strength, power, and longevity.

Tip #2 Don't jump on or off a trend too quickly

In the past, a typical trend would last centuries or at least decades. Today, a trend generally last for four to seven years.

Many people think that a color trend lasts about a year and that by the following year that color is no longer on trend. That might be what many retailers and manufactures would like you to think because it can boost sales but it isn't exactly true.

Certainly talking about color trends and naming trend colors annually has become an effective marketing tool but trends evolve rather than change completely from year to year. Anything that comes into favor and disappears just as quickly is a fad.

A typical trend curve looks like this. Keep in mind the timeline is usually from four to seven years:

A trend life cycle and the designs it inspires can differ in lengths. For example, you might remember how popular "Tuscan colors" were for home interiors at one time. At about the same time grapes and anything wine related were popular design motifs seen in these colors. Both arose from the influence of our fascination with Italy and specifically, Tuscany. The life cycle of the colors was seven or more years while the motif of grapes or wine peaked after two years and only was around for about four.

As trends change, colors shift warmer or cooler and become more or less intense. For example, recently the grays we favor have become warmer and beige (sometimes called greige.)  Also, darker brownish grays emerged followed by a return of truer brown to the color trends palette.

It doesn't mean that gray has fallen out of trend. What is means is that as things in the world have changed so have our emotions and thus the colors we want to surround ourselves with but it usually isn't a big change. It is a subtle change from year-to-year. In four or more years you will be able to look back and see a more drastic shift in what is now popular versus what once was on trend.

With all of the variety of colors available your style can evolve from one year to the next just as trends do. The great news is that if you are looking at home exterior trends they last far longer than most trends and the DaVinci Roofscapes Slate and Shake colors are timeless.

A key tip is to follow your instincts. Always select an exterior roof, siding or trim colors that you love and look best for your home. That's a true way to always be in style. If however, you just love one of those colors that is very hot right now my last tip will tell you how to keep it from looking passé.

Tip #3 Keep your colors from looking dated by avoid these combinations

Is there a color that you once loved, but today would seem outdated in your home? Some of the answers I get for that question are avocado and gold, gray and mauve as well as chocolate brown and aqua. At one time, these color combinations were all very trendy.

Do you notice anything about those popular responses?

Something they all have in common?

All of the examples are pairs of colors. Rarely does someone reply with a single color.

That is because it usually isn't a particular color that puts a time stamp on your design. It is a combination of colors that were so popular that you began seeing them everywhere. You might have even chosen them for your own scheme.

At one time, a combination of chocolate brown and aqua was so wildly popular that I started calling it "Choc-qua." Today when you see a room in these colors you can pretty accurately guess when it was decorated. 

Brown with a color other than aqua ... or even aqua with another color such as gold or navy blue or green, would be harder to know just by the colors alone. Keeping that in mind, the best way to use a trend color is to come up with your own color scheme rather than using it in the same combinations as everyone else. This is the best way to keep your color from feeling either trendy or outdated.

Using a trend color you love more creatively than other people makes your scheme a true reflection of your taste and style ... and that is always on trend!

Many paint companies have their trend forecast for 2017 online and you might enjoy seeing what is in store:

 

Then follow my three tips and you will be well on your way to using this year's hottest hues in a scheme that sizzles with style all your own.

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From Nondescript Neutral To Bold And Beautiful Color

 

 

It takes both courage make a bold color change on your exterior but as these brave homeowners prove it can be worth making the change.

When their home was built 24 years ago adding color in the eaves added color to an otherwise neutral home. It also was a different look than had been widely seen at that time and buyers were attracted to the look. Today, homes are being constructed with a whole mix of materials and the two-color look isn't quite as interesting as it once was.

In this case, the Gaskins decided to give their home an updated look by going for a few strong elements that would stand out.

Exterior Makeover Before and After 2

 

Starting At The Top
The pitch of the roof allows a large part of the roof to show. The porch roof and interesting turret draw the eye making it important that the roof looks great.

The cedar shake roof had faded to a greyish brown, was worn and starting to splinter and crack. They wanted a maintenance-free, alternative cedar-like roofing materials. They chose DaVinci Roofscapes Shake in Tahoe because they loved how it looked like natural cedar yet was far more durable and long lasting.

As you can see in the photo above, the Gaskins home is already begin looking better just by replacing their old split and curled shakes with the a DaVinci roof in the right color and style.

Fewer But Stronger Design Elements

These smart homeowners also decided to enlarge the dormer over the garage before replacing their roof. The original dormer was there but didn't stand out as a strong element on the front facade of their home. The dormer was small and competed with the green dormers cause the eye to jump around rather than land on one strong element. 

Now the two dormers work together, balance the design and make a strong statement.

Commit To Color

In the before photo you can see how the contrasting color around the base of the home was distracting. It drew the eye away from where you want to focus it. The idea may have been to "ground" the house by using this darker color but it took away rather than added to the overall look of the exterior.

The  front door had been green. The same color had been used in the dormers and to paint the floor of the porch and steps. The door, porch and tops of the steps are now all a rich cocoa brown.  

The white trim was repainted but look at how much more it stands out now which leads us to the biggest change - the main color!

 

From nondescript neutral to a bold and beautiful blue/gray.

What a spectacular change!

After sampling many colors and Mr. and Mrs. Gaskin chose an acrylic solid stain from Hallman Lindsay, a Wisconsin-based company for changing the color of their home, which is primarily cedar panels.

The color is a custom blue/grey blend that the selected after sampling about a dozen slight variations of the color they had in mind. I love that they did this because I always advise homeowners to take this step but not all of them follow that advice even though often they later wish they had.

Sampling the color is the fastest way to know you're going to love your color before your home is painted. It gives you a chance to see the color on the actual surface material and in the right light. It is almost impossible to know just by looking at a small swatch what exactly the color is going to look like once your home is painted. Sampling the paint can give you a much better idea.

The back of the back of the Gaskin's garage was a colorful canvas during the sampling process but the effort to get the color exactly right paid off. They couldn't be happier with the finished project and love driving up to their house every day.

Upgraded Exterior

Mr. Gaskins says, "We have received a lot of very positive (and envious) comments and inquiries from our neighbors about the roof and the paint. Most of the house colors in our area are a very conservative/neutral tan or white."

Indeed the neighbors are envious.

By focusing on three key elements -- roof, dormer, and color -- the Gaskin upgraded the look of their home and added thousands of dollars worth of curb appeal. Best of all they the way their home looks.

This has been one of our favorite remodeling projects and we think the results are sensational.

Do you need some help with your exterior makeover? We're here to help you get your own 5-star results.

 

 

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How The New President Can Upgrade The White House Exterior

New Roof For The White House

 

Recently I read an Elle Decor article that asked the question, Trump vs. Clinton: Who Will Decorate The White House Better?. It reminded me of how much interest there is about how the new president and their spouse will redecorate the White House. But why all the interest on the interior when far more people see the exterior?

I'd like to see our future president take my top down approach and make at least one major improvement to the exterior. After all, the White House is one of the most recognizable buildings in the world and represents America to the rest of the world. It's exterior must communicate the spirit of the county and its exterior must have international "curb appeal".

Built in 1793 the president's mansion was designed by James Hoban. It has been home to every president of the United States since John Adams was in office. I would like to see the next president take the building back to its original roof, which was slate.

Slate provided a solid roof overhead protecting the first family for more than 100 years. In the 1880s during the building expansion (when what would eventually become the West Wing was added) a metal roof replaced the original slate. The metal roof has since been repaired and/or replaced many times including during the major refurbishments of the White House during the 1920s and late 1940s.

Metal may have been thought to be a better choice than slate during earlier times but that is no longer true. Besides no one ever "oohs and aahs" over a metal roof.

By upgrading to a DaVinci Roofscapes slate roof the White House will benefit from the technical advancements that make it a long-lasting, eco-friendly and overall great choice. Plus the residents, staff and public will benefit from a roof that is beautiful as well as one that is rooted in the building's history.

As for color, originally the roof was a dark gray that was almost black. For today, I'd go in a similar direction with Smokey Gray. This would upgrade the look of the building while being true to James Hoban's original vision.

And in case you're now wondering about what I'd do with the exterior color - I'd keep it white! The color white is symbolic and deeply connected with our identity as Americans.

Here is a fact about the white that I think you'll find interesting. Many think that the White House was first painted white color during the restoration after the British burned the building in 1814. While it was coated with white at that time it was not the first time.

The original color of the White House was white. According to the White House Historical Association, when the walls were finished in 1798, they were whitewashed to keep the porous Aquia Creek sandstone from freezing in winter. It has been repainted white ever since.

Image: Freshstock

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How Does Your Dream Home Stack Up To The Best-Selling House Plan In America?

 

Everyone has an idea of their dream home. I bet when you imagine your dream home it is filled with personal style and amenities to make your life easier and more enjoyable. My dream is to have a perfect little "jewel box" of a home that is smaller than what most people imagine but my dream home is more luxury than extra space.

What is your dream home like? I bet it is far different than the dream home of your parents or grandparents. You may have similar dreams for your family and our future but today our vision of what makes an ideal home are different than they were in post-War America when developers considered rows of similar homes to be the perfectly planned suburban neighborhoods.

Today home builders have shaken the 1950's idea of a "one size/style fits most" approach. They know that the perfect homogeneity that developers once imposed is no longer a match for the range of today's families and their needs.

And when it comes to finding a home with your dream design it’s easy to be envision lots of the details you want. It is just as important to choose a home that not only meets your individual needs but also considers where you'll be building, the typography of your lot, the look of the natural landscape and whether it will be marketable to future buyers.

Often the best way to do this is by simply looking at lots of home styles and floor plans. Companies like The House Designers offer what seems like unlimited options for your floor plan and home style. With so many different designs I was curious about which one was their most popular house plan.

House Plan 1895 - L'Attesa di Vita is an affordable, mid-size home featuring classic Craftsman details in a 2,091 square foot design.

Their most popular house plan is #1895 - L'Attesa di Vita. It is an affordable, mid-size home featuring classic Craftsman details in a 2,091 square foot design.

House Plan 7878 - Vita di Lusso is a luxury version of the classic L'Attesa di Vita featuring high-end Craftsman detailing, a 3-car garage and a finished walkout basement.

For those wanting more, the house plan #7878 - Vita di Lusso is a luxury version of the classic L'Attesa di Vita featuring high-end Craftsman detailing, a 3-car garage and a finished walkout basement.

Both of these dream homes are topped off with a designer roof from DaVinci Roofscapes that adds to the beauty of the exterior and gives both of these home Craftsman-Style Curb Appeal.

If you are ready to start working on making your dream home a reality you don't want to miss your chance to Vote for the New Look of America's Best-Selling House Plan! Win up to $1,000 in Prizes!!! But don't wait. Voting ends on October 10, 2016.

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How To Handle Falling In Love With More Than One At A Time

Recently I worked with a couple who asked my advice on a topic I don't often discuss. They had fallen in love not just once but twice and needed my help.

They were remodeling their home exterior and had been doing their homework on which products and colors they wanted to use. By the time this couple contacted me they had already fallen in love with a DaVinci Slate roof in Smokey Gray. It is a great choice for their home.

They had also fallen in love with the idea of painting the siding of their home brown. They had seen other homes in their New England town that were brown and liked the look. They had looked at many dark browns but it was Benjamin Moore Falcon Brown 1238 that they loved.

DaVinci Roofscapes Multi-width Slate in Smokey Gray alongside Benjamin Moore Falcon Brown 1238

What this couple saw once they painted a section of their home and placed the roofing tile samples next to the dark brown was that the two didn't work well together. The two were both dark and although different in color similar in value (darkness or lightness) and they started to have their doubts that the two colors they fell in love with were going to work well together on their home. That is when they contacted me to give them my thoughts.

Both colors they selected were lovely on their own but were not the best choices together. Their home was large and you could see a good amount of the roof. There home was also shaded by many trees. Even with contrasting trim and a welcoming color on the front door the overall look would still be too dark and could seem a bit ominous. At the same time I understood that they had a vision of their home in brown and gray that they weren't ready to give up on.

Following my "top down" method for selecting home exterior colors it didn't take long before these homeowners and I came up with an alternative we all were happy with.

From two loves to true loves --
DaVinci Roofscapes Multi-width Slate in Smokey Gray and 
Benjamin Moore Bear Creek 1470

We started with the Smokey Gray roof and then looked for a brown that was a little lighter and slightly more gray. After sampling a couple of colors it was Benjamin Moore Bear Creek 1470 that captured the hearts of my homeowners. It isn't a huge change but the color was just different enough to change the exterior dynamic and created exactly the look these homeowners first had in mind.

You might think the reason people make mistakes with choosing color is that they aren't good at picking colors but believe it or not that isn't always the reason. Often is is because they get an idea in their mind and don't know how to create the look unless they use the same exact colors they've seen. Or they might find more than one color that they just love and are blinded to the fact that they don't work well together.

Over the years, I help many homeowners who are purchasing a gorgeous polymer slate or shake roof from DaVinci Roofscapes to choose the right color for their roof as well as the other elements of their exterior. From the choice of 50 color and a whole range of blends it is easy for homeowners to fall in love with one that they really want to use.

The next step is to make sure that all of the elements that will be used on the exterior work together. Since a DaVinci roof last a very long time and plays a major role in creating curb appeal, I always say to start from the top down. 

The roof can be 30 percent or more of what you see as you approach a home. Blending the color of your roofing material with other elements of the home exterior will create an overall cohesive look. When the roof and the main are working together it allows you to have many choices for your trim and accent colors. This also makes it easier to change the color of your front door or shutters and give you home a new look in a few years down the road. 

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More Tips For Exterior Color From The Top Down

In my last blog post I gave you the top 3 reasons that homeowners are opting to go with a neutral as the main color for their home more than ever before. I also shared tips on how to set a home apart when starting with a neutral as the main color of the exterior.

Today I'm giving you a few more tips for choosing colors from the top down for your home exterior. Again in these examples, each of the homes below are painted an identical neutrals color. Then starting with the roof I've given you a quick tip for choosing accent colors inspired by your roof color.

To keep the illustrations simple, I'm showing the main accent on the front door and the secondary accent on the trim however you can use these colors in whatever why best suits your home and gives it personality. For example, with a light trim color the secondary color could be used on the shutters. 

If your home has a DaVinci Slate in Smokey Gray or similar color you're in luck. Gray, easily the most popular roofing color, goes with just about every color on a home. Against a neutral base, use one dark version of a color you love and another medium to light version in the same color --- like the blue tones shown here.

DaVinci Slate in European blend is gray with a twist. Mixed in with the mostly gray roof is a bit of muted burgundy. Whenever your roof has a touch of color you can play up the color added to the gray roofing blend by using a deeper or darker shade for the front door. A medium gray accent on trim work brings the entire look together.

DaVinci Slate Aberdeen Blend is a good example of a multi-color roof. With a multi-color roof choose two of its colors as accents for the home exterior. This blend of complementary hues of olive green and brick red bring out the beauty of the roof.

These ideas plus many more tips for creating curb appeal with "Color From The Top Down" are captured in two infographics -- Color From The Top Down Infographic and Top Tips for Creating "Top Down" Curb Appeal. View and download both now with our compliments. And for even more great ideas visit the Color Studio.

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Tips For Exterior Color From The Top Down

More today than perhaps at any time in the past homeowners are opting to go with a neutral as the main color for their home. There are many reasons neutrals have risen in popularity but these are three of the main reasons. First, there are more neutrals available and they are far more interesting than the old boring beige of years ago. There are chromatic grays and beiges with depth and complexity that give the colors character.

Second, the growing popularity of mixing materials on a home's exterior requires a color that can blend with many different textures, finishes and colors making a neutral the perfect solution. Last, a strong desire to have a home that blends with the environment -- "outdoors in, indoors out" -- and using a neutral as a main color is the easiest way to seamlessly connect a house to its surroundings.

With this movement towards more neutral exteriors many homeowners wonder how they can set their home apart. Choosing colors from the top down is the best way to figure out the right color scheme for your home exterior. For example, each of the homes below are painted an identical neutrals color. Starting with the roof I'll give you a quick tip for choosing accent colors inspired by your roof color that will give your home a unique personality. 

To keep the illustrations simple, I'm showing the main accent on the front door and the secondary accent on the trim however you can use these colors in whatever why best suits your home. For example, with a light trim color the secondary color could be used on the shutters.

If your home has a roof with the tones of DaVinci Shake in Tahoe blend look for an accent color that is enhanced by brown. Green is a natural complement to this shade of brown roofing. Pick a favorite shade from yellow-green to true green (or blue green!) for the front door. A lighter shade of brown for trim work contrasts nicely with this neutral body color.

DaVinci Shake in Mountain is a deep neutral blend that lives between brown and gray. If your home has a roof with warm gray or brown tones warm accent colors are often the best choice. Harmonize colors from the warm side of the color wheel to flow from the roof down. Classic gold on the door and warm grays or bronzes accent the rich tones of this roof color while creating curb appeal on the neutral main color.

DaVinci Shake Autumn Blend is a good example of a red-orange based brown on the roof that is enhanced by a complementary blue-green on the front door. A deep coppery red similar to colors of the roof makes a perfect secondary accent color.

The same idea works well whether your home has DaVinci Shake, DaVinci Slate or any other type of roof. Many of my tips for creating curb appeal with "Color From The Top Down" are captured in two infographics -- Color From The Top Down Infographic and Top Tips for Creating "Top Down" Curb Appeal. View and download both now with our compliments.

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Color From The Top Down Infographic

Has a home ever caught your eye simply because it was so well put together? The home might not be your favorite style or It might not be painted a color you love but you couldn't help admire its overall look. That’s a home with true curb appeal.

Does your home have curb appeal? If not, now is a great time to think about what steps you need to take to give your home that eye-catching look. August is National Curb Appeal Month and to help you get started we've put together our Color From The Top Down tips to get you started. A great color scheme starting at the roof and flowing down your exterior is a great way to give your home curb appeal, increase its appeal and value.

For more ideas about how to create curb appeal see our infographic Top Tips for Creating "Top Down" Curb Appeal.

You will also find a wealth of information in the DaVinci Roofscapes Color Studio. Go there now download our two free ebooks that give you the step-by-step guidance you need when selecting any colors or products for your exterior.

Now that you know how to add curb appeal to your home get start now. After all it is National Curb Appeal Month.

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Understanding Paint Color Undertone

 

When it comes to choosing color for your home, what you don't immediately see about a paint color is as important as what you do notice.

Color is dynamic and energetic. Every color has a vibrant public persona, but it also has more subtle attributes that the human eye does not immediately see. This is what makes color both fascinating and frustrating. One of the most effective techniques for alleviating frustration and mastering color is to understand how color undertones affect what the eye actually sees.

More than meets the eye

It is easy to think that first see about a color gives you all the information you need. But you can't always trust what you see. Often a color’s has qualities that at first are concealed. It isn't until you take a closer look that you discover exactly what a color is all about.

There is the color you first notice but there may also be a quality that is less obvious. This is the color’s undertone and it is often "hidden" and takes a closer look to see. It is important however that you do take a closer look because if you fail to recognize the colors undertone, it will show up when you least expect it. Choosing a color, especially a neutral, without considering the undertone can cause the color schemes you thought was perfect to feel amiss.

Understanding Undertone

To understand undertone you need to know that colors have both mass tone and undertone. Mass tone is the color you immediately see. Undertone is the characteristic of the color that is often concealed when a color is viewed on its own. Undertones become more apparent when a color is place near other colors.

In some colors, the mass tone and undertone are very similar; other colors have undertones that are quite different from their mass tone. A true blue, for example, will have a mass tone and an undertone that are very close to the same hue. However, turquoise has an undertone of either green or blue and periwinkle has an undertone of violet. Sometimes the undertone is referred as the way a color "leans" -- a turquoise that leans blue or a purple that leans red. These undertones are usually easy to see. 

With whites, neutrals and muted colors, that isn’t always the case. The more complex and less pure the color is, the more difficult it can become to determine the undertone. In my experience, either not recognizing, or incorrectly identifying undertone causes most color mishaps.

An example of a well-chosen white. The color blends beautifully with the surrounding
and the
Bellaforté Shake Shingles in Mountain Vari-Blend.

Finding the undertone

Understanding how to select the correct color is important, but selecting the correct color that also has the right undertone is even more important on your home's exterior. Here’s why: if you’ve ever seen or created a scheme that you thought should work, but didn’t, it was probably the undertones threw the scheme off rather than the mass tones of the colors. The specific colors you chose may have had undertones that were fighting each other instead of working together.

The mass tone and the undertone of the colors you select need to work together to create a harmonious color scheme. Now that you understand the importance of identifying the undertone, the next step is to learn how to detect it. For those just learning, the easiest way to see the undertone is to compare one color to another similar color. Start by looking at your chosen color alongside other colors from the same color family. Although the hues all belong to the same color family, you will see how their undertones are different. For example, some blues will lean more purple, while others will lean more green.

Comparing your paint swatch to the purest version of the main color is another way to see the undertone. When you place your blue swatch next to a true or pure blue, the undertones will become apparent.

This technique works for white as well. If you thought white was exempt from the undertone issue, think again. When looking at a white swatch on its own, it may be almost impossible to distinguish the undertone. Look at the same swatch next to pure white and it will mysteriously turn into a faint yellow or pink or some other color. That is the magic of undertone.

Neutral territory

Neutrals are a bit more difficult. You can compare neutrals to other similar neutrals, but that doesn’t guarantee you will easily recognize the color of their undertone. Neutrals are the toughest to get right, but don’t let that discourage you.

One way to confirm the undertone of the neutral you select won't class with your other colors is to place the neutral swatch against pure hues -- red, yellow, blue, green, orange, or purple. If your neutral has a green undertone, placing it next to red (the complement of green) will bring the green undertone out. If the neutral if the neutral has red or pink undertones those will more clearly come into view against green. Yellow undertones pop out against purple, orange against blue,

A little tidbit that can help you to know your right is that while neutrals can have an undertone of any color some are most common:

  • Beiges undertones are green, yellow/gold, red/pink and occasionally orange.
  • Undertones of colors most people describe as a gray are blue, green or purple.
  • Taupe or Greige is a color that is between beige and gray and doesn't lean towards a particular color.
     

Creating harmonies

It’s important to identify the undertone of your paint color because selecting a main color and trim color with harmonious undertones is the secret to creating a successful color scheme. Evaluating the color and its undertones is well worth the effort. Expertly choosing colors that harmonize is the foundation for designing a beautiful exterior. It may seem challenging at first, but like most things – a little effort now will pay off every time you look at your home.

Ready to know even more about choosing color? Here is another post that can help you as you choose your exterior color Color Lesson: Defining Colors

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How To Choose The Right Roof For Your "Storybook" Home

Often when someone is telling me about how they want their home to look they use the word "storybook" to describe the style. As far as I know this is not a term used in architectural design, however I do know exactly what the homeowner means.

As we were growing up most of us saw lots of pictures of homes in the books we read. The illustrations often included unusual details, fun shapes and even some not-often-seen in real life colors. Although most of the pictures were stylized, your idea of a quaint home with unique details can be brought to life.

Your home does not need to be large and in fact many of the homes described as "storybook" are small homes or cottages. It does however need to have some details that make it special. After all, that is what captured your heart in the pages of the picture book.

Bellaforté Shake in Mountain-VariBlend

Above is an example of a "storybook" home. From the thick shake roof and details under the roof peaks to the lattice on the windows, exposed beams and window box this little charmer could have come out straight off the page of a children's book.

A "storybook" home looks best with bolder details like a thicker shake that is uneven rather than a traditional single-width shake.

DaVinci Slate also works well on this type of home. I usually recommend a multi-width slate roof alternative for these little dream homes but a single with can work, too especially if it is colorful. Speaking of which - have some fun with the color. Multi-color roof tiles are a perfect fit here. Select multi-width slate in Aberdeen, European, Vineyard or Weathered Green. This is the one type of home where it is better to go with more rather than less when it comes to details.

These homes are so much fun to renovate because the possibilities are just about endless. In fact, usually the only lament is, "There are too many colors and I can't make up my mind". Don't worry I've got you covered on that one. You can see what I recommend here.

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How Light Affects The Colors Of Your Home

To understand how different types of light affect color you have to know a little about what light is, how it “works”, and its relationship to color.

Light is one of the many waves found on the electromagnetic spectrum. Other waves on the spectrum include ultra violet, radio, microwaves and x-rays. What differentiates light from the others is that it is the only one that can be detected by the human eye.

 

All of the colors we see are a byproduct of spectrum light, as it is reflected off or absorbed into an object. All of the colors we see are a byproduct of spectrum light, as it is reflected off or absorbed into an object. An object that reflects back all of the rays of light will appear white; an object that absorbs all of the rays, black.

​All of the millions of other colors are produced by a combination of light rays being absorbed and reflected. Grass, for example, absorbs all colors except the ones that make up its color of green.

The Effects of Natural Light

Natural light can vary greatly depending on the weather, the season, the time of day, the position of the sun in the sky, the location of the building and where the space is located within the building. Understanding these factors can help you to anticipate how natural light will affect a color.

Light that comes from a northern direction can cast a cool, blue to gray tint on the objects it washes over. Northern light is indirect and can make colors appear darker and less saturated. Keep this in mind as you look at sample of the paint or roofing you are considering. For home facing north you will want to make sure the color you selected comes to life once on your home.

You may need to compensate for the lighting by considering a roof tile or paint color that is slightly lighter than you first thought to give you the look you are after. For your front door or other accent colors on a home that faces north, you may want to go with a color that is slightly more intense. Inside your home, colors that work best with northern light are light in value and clear or bright rather than grayed or muted.

One of the nice things about selecting colors for a northern exposure is that it is the most diffused light and remains quite consistent throughout the day. This is why with northern light, your color both inside and out will look basically the same throughout the day.

Southern light adds to the warmth and beauty of DaVinci Shake in Tahoe-Variblend

On the other hand, homes with a southern exposure will benefit from beautiful warm light however, midday the light can become very intense or glaring. To solve this problem on the interior use colors that are muted with a bit of grey to absorb some of the intense light so the room feels more comfortable.

On the exterior choose colors that won't look washed out in the strong noontime sun. It is extra important to sample your colors and look at them throughout the day or better yet several days to make sure the colors are not too bright in the early morning or late afternoon light.

Like southern light, western exposure is also warm. It cast a yellowish orange light that changes throughout the day as the sun moves across the sky. This light is softer and more yellow in the morning moving to intense and reddish orange in late afternoon. Colors that are warm and not too muted or grayed can work well. Brown and warm earthy color comes to life in southern light. When using blue and green the ones that are warmer can also work well both inside and out.

Light that comes from eastern exposure is between soft and can be bluish or yellowish depending on your location. It is neither as cool as northern light or warm as southern or western light. It enhances lighter colors 

The Effects of Artificial Light

Artificial light supplements natural light so it can important for you to know how a space will be lit when selecting colors. The type of artificial lighting in a space influences how a color looks. Some of the most common sources are fluorescent and incandescent light bulbs, halogen bulbs, and LED lighting.

Halogen lighting is nearly white and the closest to natural light on a clear day around noon. Fluorescent lighting is more bluish although now some fluorescent bulbs produce light bands close to daylight. Incandescent lighting produces a yellowish light.

When thinking about how your lightening and colors will work together, consider that warm, yellowish light can intensify warm colors and mute cooler hues, while cool bluish light does the opposite. For example, incandescent lighting cast warm light that can enhance reds, oranges and yellows; Cool fluorescent light works best with blues, violets and greens.

Look At The Colors In Context

When you know how lighting effects color it can help you to understand why a color doesn't look exactly as you would have expected. But keep in mind that this is only one factor among many that can change how a color appears. There is atmospheric impact, the texture of the surface, and the adjacent colors to name a few. That is why you must make your decisions while looking at the colors exactly where you plan to use them and at different times of day. The more you know about how other factors can change color the better your chances of finding a color you will be pleased with for your home.

PS: If you enjoyed learning about light, I think you'll also like my last post Color Lesson: Defining Colors

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Color Lesson: Defining Colors

After working with hundreds of homeowners I know that a little color knowledge can go a long way to end your frustration when choosing colors for your home exterior. What I'm sharing with you today is quick lesson in how understanding the characteristics of color can make choosing the right color easier.

This home featuring DaVinci Single-Width Slate has chosen colors where the hue, value and chroma all work nicely together.

In order to organize and communicate about color we use three characteristics: hue, value and chroma. Now don't click away because you think I'm about to get all scientific on you because I'm not. These are just the technical terms for how you already talk about color everyday. If you’ve ever described a color as light blue gray or deep dark green, you’ve expressed all three of these attributes of color.

Let's break it down because these three characteristics are actually what you are trying to get right. When you don't like a color you've selected it is because one or more of them is off and thus the color is not what you had in mind. That is when the frustration starts. Knowing how to think of the color in terms of its characteristics can put an end to your frustration.

HUE
Hue and color are often used synonymously, but hue refers more specifically to the colors of the visual spectrum — red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet. These hues, along with the six intermediate hues of red-orange, yellow-orange, blue-green, blue-violet, and red-violet, are the pure colors that circle the color wheel. These twelve hues -- often called color families-- can be blended to produce an untold number of colors.

VALUE

Value describes the lightness or darkness of a color in terms of how close it is to white or black. Blending black with a pure hue darkens it; conversely adding white lightens it. This changes the amount of light emanating from the color, which changes the color’s value. The lighter the color, the higher its value. For example, navy blue emits less light and has a lower value than sky blue.

The value of the color and texture of the material will affect the amount of light reflected. To help you determine the value of different colors most paint companies include the LRV (Light Reflectance Value) on the back of the color samples or an index for their entire line of paints.

The higher the LRV, the more light reflected. Color with lower LRV reflect less light. A white or very light color will have a high LRV, while a dark one will have a lower LRV.  

Some areas specify that colors be within a certain LRV range. In Tucson, Arizona, there are guidelines that homes must be constructed with materials that fall within a certain LRV range, to ensure an earthy desert look is consistent throughout the town.

Guidelines for LRV are also often used to conserve energy consumption in a building. For example, in a hot climate if you want your home to absorbs less heat you would use a lighter (LRV of 50 or higher) and smoother finish. In cooler climates a darker and more coarsely textured service could serve to keep a home warmer.

Also some materials have LRV recommendations. For example most vinyl manufacturers recommend using a LRV of 55 or higher when painting PVC/Vinyl. 

As you can see there is more to understanding color value than you may have realized.

CHROMA
Chroma is the attribute that expresses the brightness or purity of a color. You may not be familiar with the word chroma, because it is often expressed as intensity or saturation. The human eye does not easily perceive the differences between intensity and saturation, thus the terms are often used interchangeably.

The closer colors are to their pure hue the higher their chroma. High chroma colors are described as clear, pure, brilliant, bright, rich, bold, or vivid. Colors that are less intense or saturated are described as toned-down, soft, muted, subtle, misty, dull, drab or dusty.

This is the characteristic of color that trip people up most when it comes to finding a color that matches the idea of the color they have in mind. Here's why.

When we look at paint samples we are naturally attracted to the color we think look prettiest or best on the color swatch. Those colors however are rarely the ones we like painted on our homes. Once that color that looked so pretty in the paint store spread out over one or two stories you may find that it looks too bright and much more colorful than what you had in mind when you were looking at the swatch.

If you were to look at a home painted in a color you love and then went to the store to find the actual color I bet you'd be surprised at how blah it looks compared to the colors in the fan deck. That is because the full beauty isn't apparent when looking at that small sample especially under artificial lighting. Once you see this less "colorful" paint on your home it can come to life.

Colors like SW 7657 Tinsmith or SW 7015 Repose Gray might not jump off the paint chip racks at you yet they may be just the color you need to enhance your cedar shake roofing or the stone around entrance. SW 6215 Rocky River may not look like much when you see only a 2" square but wait until you see how beautiful it looks on your shutters. I think you get the point.

The bottom line is that most of the time the colors that will work best on your home exterior are not the ones you think look the prettiest on the swatches. The color you are actually looking for is far more likely to be one of the colors you passed over a first glance thinking it was too dull. Slow down and give some of those more toned down colors a second look. I bet the color you fall in love with on the exterior of your home will not be a color that first caught your attention.

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Color Risks Not To Take

Have you ever wanted to be bolder with your color choices? Try something that really stands out or shouts "wow"? If so, I say, 

"Go for it!"

The only caveat I'll add is that you make wise choices about where, when and how you get adventurous with color.

Don't Turn A Short-Lived Fascination Into Your Long Term Solution

If you want to top off your look with bright blue strands like Katy Perry or rainbow highlights like Selena Gomez give it a try. It would be best to wait until after an important job interview or big day to dye your hair but other than that, why not? You can take that color risk. If you don't love your unconventional hair color no problem. Your hair will grow out or you can recolor it or maybe it was only temporary to begin with. It is a color risk but one without big consequences if it goes wrong.

The time not to take a color risk is when you are topping off your home with a new roof. A roof with a lifetime warranty last a long time so you are going to live with that decision for many years. That doesn't mean you only have to go with black or gray although those are often great choices. All of DaVinci Roofscapes 50 colors are inspired by nature what I consider "can't go wrong" colors. Still if you need some guidance we are here to help. Start by going to the Color Studio where you will find lots of great guidance. If you still need help you can get in touch by going to "Get Advice From Our Color Expert"

Multi-Width Slate in Aberdeen was a wise not risky choice for this home.

When Choosing Colors And Patterns, Don't Create Confusion

In fashion mixing prints and patterns is often said to be one of the riskiest trends. However, when you get it right, it can give you a show stopping look. For mixing patterns in fashion you may hear that the way to go is to stick with the same color families in the prints. That can work but you don't have to use all of the same colors. The real key is to make sure that one of the patterns, regardless of the colors, acts as a neutral. Not necessarily that it is a neutral color but neutral because the pattern doesn't call too much attention to itself. So go ahead and combine patterns with many colors. Just keep in mind that all of the prints can be different but only one or two can really stand out. 

When choosing a roof or other materials with texture or pattern for your home you need to keep that same advice in mind. For example, when choosing roofing tiles, you can choose a single color with soft variation, several similar colors or multi colors. The same is true in materials such as stone or brick. It is the variation between the colors that accentuates the pattern. When you mix these different colors, textures and patterns on a home exterior they cannot all compete for attention. If your home is a solid color brick that can act as your neutral when adding a patterned roof such as DaVinci Slate in Aberdeen, Vineyard or European blends. If you brick has lots of variation of colors in it then the roof should not include lots of color or pattern variations or it will compete with the brick pattern. A roof that is more solid in color will allow the brick to stand out and the two elements will work together to create a cohesive look.

You Can Overdo Accessories But Not Accent Colors

As Michael Kors says, "I've always thought of accessories as the exclamation point of a woman's outfit." I couldn't agree more and encourage to take risks with color and style when it comes to accessorizing your style. Personally, I follow the "more is better" philosophy of Iris Apfel. Take risks with your accessories and accent colors. And if you aren't sure it works take this bit of advice from Coco Chanel, who gave this advice about dressing with accessories, “Before you leave the house, look in the mirror and take one thing off.”

The way I think about accents and accessories for you home exterior is almost the opposite of the way I think about these things in fashion. On your exterior more is not always better. A few well-placed color and accent pieces are going to give your home the best look. Too many will keep your eye jumping from place to place never allowing it to focus on any one spot. Figure out the one or two things about the front of you home that make a statement. Then you can find ways to use embellish or call attention to these features. Color is a great way to have those elements grab the spotlight. Painting your front an eye-catching color calls attention to your entrance. An accent roof can highlight an attractive bay window. The colors on your patio that link to the colors inside can fool the eye and make the interior space feel larger.

You Don't Need To Be Cautious With Color

Once you understand where, when and how it makes sense to take risks with color and when it doesn't you can make choices that work well for you. So go on and get a bit bolder with your color choices. Sometimes risks are worth taking.

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Choosing The Right Color For A Stucco Home

When it comes to choosing a color for a stucco home three blends of composite slate are selected time-and-time again by homeowners Canyon, Brownstone and Sonora.

Once that decision is made most homeowner turn their attention to selecting the main color for the body of their home.

Tan is a traditional color that works well on stucco. My recommendation is to go a bit lighter rather than darker when selecting a nice neutral tan. A color like PPG Pittsburgh Paints FLLW840 Wright Grey Tan would be a good choice.

Brownstone composite roof is the right color for this stucco homeYellow is another color that is often used on stucco. Finding the perfect yellow or gold can be a bit tricky so take your time and always test out a large patch before giving the painters the go aheand. Yellow visually expands very quickly as you go from the color that looked just right on the small swatch to a large wall on your home's exterior. Suddenly your color may seem way too bold or bright. Look for a toned down golden yellow or wheat rather than a true yellow. One that I like is PPG Pittsburgh Paints Turning Oakleaf PPG1107-3

White is color for stucco. Sherwin-Williams Alabaster or Benjamin Moore Simply White are popular choices. Take a good look at the white you choose by comparing it to other white paint chips. This will help you to really see the color and its undertone. Some whites are bright and clear, others grayed down a bit and still others are a bit pink or blue or yellow, etc.

Most homeowners prefer a true white or one that is slightly yellow. White that is slightly grayed down is another type of white that works well. Steer clear of any whites that have a pink or blue undertone when you compare them with other whites. The reason that this is important with stucco is that the textured nature of the stucco tends to make subtle undertones of the color you choose stand out as the light of the day changes. For example, even a hint of yellow or gold in your white paint can make your home take on a slightly golden glow at sunrise or sunset. This would be very nice with your roof color whereas a bluish cast would not be as attractive. 

As for accent colors, use one color on your stucco banding, and trim (soffits, fascia, door trim, garage doors etc.). Use a second color on the front door to create a focal point. A stained front door is a nice choice while a paint door will have more contrast. Traditionally blues, blue/green or greens were used although just about any color could work. Why not go non-traditional with a color you love. Just find the right tone so that it stands out while fitting into your overall scheme. 

Do you want to step out and try a non-traditional color for the body of your home? Green, pink or just about any color could be a possibility. It is important to remember that a little color can go a long way. Go too bright, bold or strong and your color will feel overwhelming. It also may not go over well with the neighbors. A hint of an unexpected color may be all you need to give your stucco home a big personality.

 

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Find Out What Color The Easter Bunny Chose For His Lifetime Roof

Recently I was asked to provide color consulting services for a very special client, The Easter Bunny. Mr. Bunny needed to put a new roof on his home. After researching all of the options, he wanted a luxury roof from DaVinci Roofscapes. But, like many homeowners, he wasn't sure how to choose just the right color. They asked me to give him my color advice.

With good reason I thought that Mr. Bunny would want a custom blend that was as bright and colorful as the eggs he dyes each year. I explained that we could make a special color roof or roof tile blend in any color his warm and fuzzy heart desired. I even showed him a couple of examples of a beautiful blue and perfect pink that we had custom blended for two princesses living in Florida to spark his imagination. Much to my surprise that wasn't what he had in mind at all.

One of the things that had attracted him to DaVinci, in addition to its resistance to impact, hail and fire, was that all 50 polymer roofing colors were inspired by nature. Rather than a brightly-colored storybook roof, he wanted one that would blend in with the surroundings. While he likes his egg dyeing studio to be bright and attention-getting, for his home Mr. Bunny wanted to create a hideaway that insures that after the busy Spring season he will be able to rest and relax undisturbed. Now that I understood, I was able to go in a different direction with my recommendation. I narrowed it down and had the awesome DaVinci customer care team send out samples for him to look at on his roof.

Because it was so close to Easter I decided to send him a little surprise that would drive home the point of just how natural the synthetic slate and shake roofing tiles look. I dyed a very special dozen eggs in a variety of DaVinci colors. The eggs arrived with the roofing samples and a note challenging Mr. Bunny to hide these eggs around his home and hold a special egg hunt to see if his friends could find these eggs. I felt confident that these special eggs would be camouflaged so well that they would be hard to find, if they are found at all.

Luckily after the special egg hunt, as I expected, even his color specialist had a difficult time finding the eggs hidden among the stones, soil, grasses and other colors of the natural landscape. Eventually those with the most discerning eye for color were able to find most of the eggs but there are still two or three yet to be located.

The Easter Bunny is satisfied. He confidently selected the mix of colors I had recommend in Bellaforte Slate. Now when Mr. Bunny hops down the trail to his burrow after a long season he will be welcomed to his own private hideaway. With a solid roof overhead in a color that blends with his natural surrounding he can relax into a much-deserved rest.

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The Power Of Color On Your Home Exterior

March is a month for celebrating color! The International Colour Association has named March 21st as International Colour Day dedicated to understanding color - one of the most influential phenomena in our lives. It is also Color Therapy Month dedicated to celebrating the healing power of color.

International Colour Day and Color Therapy Month

 

According to Color Therapy Month founder Eleyne-Mari (a color therapist and director of Aura House School of Color and Light), March was selected for Color Therapy Month because it typically conjures thoughts of colorful rainbows and the color green, which represents prosperity, good health, renewal and growth.

Marking both the beginning of spring and International Colour Day March 21st seems a perfect time to think about color in relation to your home because this is the time of year when many of us start putting together our plans for what we will do to improve our home exteriors.

To celebrate the power of color how about some "color therapy" for your home? With the focus on green this month together with the fact that natural greens are on trend I thought it would be a great time to share some of my favorites ways to had green's power of prosperity, well-being, and renewal to your home. As always I like to look at color from the top down.

If I suggested green for your roof you might think about the bright green metal of a farmhouse and cringe at the thought. No need to think I'm asking you to jump into the color deep end. Take a look at these gorgeous and environmentally friendly roofs from DaVinci Roofscapes in Weathered Green and Evergreen Variblend. Now we're talking green roofing options that even a color-shy person can love. 

DaVinci Multi-Width Synthetic Slate Shingles Weathered Green
DaVinci Multi-Width Slate Weathered Green

​Bellaforté Fake Slate Evergreen Variblend
Bellaforté Slate Evergreen-VariBlend

You could also add copper accents on your exterior that as they age the patina turns them a lovely shade of green called verdigris.

If you prefer a green that you think is too dark or too vibrant to be used as a main color on your home consider using it as an accent color. Green can be a good choice as a complement to brick or to add life to neutral siding or stained wood.

Green exterior color with Therma-Tru front door
Image courtesy of Therma-Tru Doors

Haas Green Garage Door
Image courtesy of Hass Garage Door

And of course you can always use green as the main color on your home exterior. When you think about color therapy for your home (aka updating your exterior) think about green as a way to help you use the power of color to bring even more prosperity and well-being into your home.

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