Heber Valley: A Hot Spot for DaVinci Roofing

What's going on in Heber Valley, Utah?

During the past several years we've witnessed a constant increase in DaVinci polymer roofing being specified and installed in this beautiful area of the country.

Where can you find synthetic shake and simulated slate roofing in Heber Valley? Everywhere.

composite shake Designer roof imitation shake

Designer Kevin Price has specified our polymer shake roofing tiles on many of the homes in the Red Ledges community and is still going strong with DaVinci roofing products. (See Designer Shakes Up Utah Roofs) "Since the roof in this desert setting takes the most abuse from the sun and weather, it needs to be both functional and aesthetically pleasing," says Price, president of Kevin Price Designs. "Both the Multi-Width Shake and Bellaforté Shake lightweight roofing materials we've been using capture both desires perfectly."

On Top Roofing has also seen an increase in usage of DaVinci polymer slate roofing materials. The company has installed our products on many high-end multi-family homes in the area. The new construction projects are starting off right ... with Multi-Width Slate roofs in the Slate Gray color blend.

Head to the downtown Heber Valley Visitor Center and you'll also find a DaVinci tile roofing --- right on their building! (See Heber Valley Visitor Center)

polymer shakeConstructed in 1992, the alpine-style visitor's center was in dire need of a new roof. "When the team started pressure washing our wood shake roof, water began leaking into the building," says Rachel Kahler, marketing and events manager for the Heber Valley Visitors Center. "The original wood shake roof had deteriorated badly over time and had finally given out.

"After reviewing our options and budget, we decided the best solution was new Bellaforté Shake composite roofing from DaVinci Roofscapes in a Tahoe-VariBlend. These simulated shake tiles beautifully accent our peg-and-groove building. The tiles look extremely authentic. People now stop in our visitors center and ask us about the roof on the building!"

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Meet Michael Cobb

At DaVinci Roofscapes we're offering a warm welcome to Michael Cobb, our new Vice President of Sales and Marketing.

Michael, who has more than 26 years of building industry experience, will lead the company's sales force, customer service team and marketing efforts. Most recently with Nichiha, USA, Inc. in roles involving sales, marketing and logistics. Michael has additional industry experience with Louisiana-Pacific, Nailite International, James Hardie Building Products and Velux-America.

In his new leadership role at DaVinci Roofscapes, Michael will build on all his previous experiences to allow him to manage the sales and marketing for our polymer roofing company. (look what's ahead this year for us at  DaVinci Roofscapes Predicts Demand to Increase in 2017 for Synthetic Roofing)

"We're excited to bring Michael's industry expertise and insights to our team at DaVinci,"  says Ray Rosewall, president and CEO of DaVinci Roofscapes. "In particular, his sales leadership will support the sustained growth we've seen during the past decade for our simulated shake and imitation slate roofing products. With demand continually increasing for synthetic roofing products, we know Michael can lead us into new markets and support our enhanced sales efforts."

Michael and his family are based in Atlanta, where he enjoys boating, golfing and reading. He'll be making the commute to DaVinci headquarters in Kansas on a regular basis to focus on the growth of DaVinci and meeting the needs of our valued customers. 

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Color Inspiration From The Top Down

Replacing a roof is often the first step in updating your home's exterior. If so, then the roof will set the direction for many other design decisions. It is worth taking the time to select a style and color that both you and your home will love for a long time.

Know What You Like And What You Don't Like

Look around at other homes to see what builders and homeowners have selected for houses similar to your own. Make note of the style, colors, and materials. Does the overall look of the home appeal to you? Do you love the shake roof with cream trim against dark siding? Perhaps a gray state above a traditional black and white exterior speaks to your sense classic design and timeless design.

The more you can see looks you like on homes that are similar to your own, the easier it becomes to imagine a new look for your own home. It is easy to snap pictures of the color schemes and materials you like and maybe even some you don't to remind you to make sure you don't make the same mistakes.

Start With Your Roof For A Fabulous Exterior Top To Bottom

Innovative roofing materials allow you to add the beauty and dimension of traditional slate or shake and the easy care, long-life and resilience of a beautifully engineered product. You can also find exactly the right color and know that it will stay that color for the life of the roof.

Gray continues to be a favorite for slate and why not. It goes with every scheme. With a variety of shades of gray available you are sure to find the perfect gray for your home. Check out our Best 50 Shades Of Gray Infographic.

For shake, Tahoe, Mountain and Autumn are all favorites. When you have a shake roof tones of warm brown are a natural choice.

Today's architects, designers and even homeowners are posting images of their completed home exteriors online so in addition to scoping out houses in your local area you can find home from just about anywhere. Check out Houzz or This Old House or even our own gallery.

Please keep in mind, however, that some home colors work better in particular regions than the same color does in other areas. For example, bright colors that are a hit in southern Florida might not fare as well in a Philadelphia suburb. 

Last, always keep in mind that while you want your home to have your personal stamp on it you also want it to fit into your neighborhood. I know I've created a great exterior design when the homeowners love the home and it stands out for its great design while still fitting in with the surroundings. 

One sure fire way to create a home exterior that fits in anywhere is to find colors that blend with your natural surroundings. One of nature's neutrals mixed with natural materials like stone and DaVinci Slate or Shake and you begin to forget where your home ends and the natural surroundings begin. Is it any wonder that nature-based colors are by far the most popular for home exteriors?

For help with choosing your exterior colors visit our color studio and try the color tool or download our FRESH Home Exterior Colors Guides.

 

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Roofers: Setback Patterns to Speed Up Installation

If you're a roofer installing Bellaforté Shake tiles, you are familiar with the "false break" that gives the synthetic shake tile the appearance of being several smaller pieces to resemble the look of real wood shake. You may have scratched your head a time or two if, when installing this product, the false break lines up vertically.

Not to worry ... we have a solution.

Our experienced Technical Service Manager at DaVinci Roofscapes, Tyler Storfa, has handled this question several times in the field. His recommendation is to use a setback pattern that can really speed up installation of Bellaforté Shake tiles.

shake roofing materials"Bellaforté is installed from left to right," says Storfa. "The four-course repeating pattern runs up the left hand side rake. This can be cut on the ground and taken and applied on the roof."

Storfa says the first course (full course) is a full piece of field tile with the water channel or gutter removed. The second course (B course) is cut at approximately the letter "B" in the imprinted word "Bellaforté" on the tile (located in the upper left hand side of the tile) and then laid close to the edge of the tile. For the third course, repeat steps of first course. And the Fourth course (E course), take a new shake tile and cut at the last "E" in the word "Bellaforté at the top of every tile," discarding any waste product to the left of the letter "E." No "B" and "E" courses can be together without a "full" in between

Want an easy way to remember this installation pattern? Try this mantra: Full (with gutter removed), B, Full (with gutter removed), E. Yes, that's it: Full, B, Full, E!

Have other questions about installing Bellaforté products? See Bellaforte by DaVinci – Engineered to Withstand High Winds and DaVinci Solid Accessory Tiles.

 

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Top Five DaVinci Reroofing Projects of 2016

Project #1: Matching Roofs on House and Shed

For Dave and Jeannie Schwab, the effort of cleaning and applying shake oil to their massive real cedar shake roof every five years or so eventually wore them down. They loved the look of shake on their home, but hated the maintenance aspects. So they shopped for a new composite shake for their home and matching potting shed --- and decided on DaVinci Multi-Width Shake roofing in a Mountain blend.

composite shake

"Our home was built in 1993 and there's a lot of roofing involved in its design. Eventually the roof really needed to be replaced. We liked how the natural cedar roofing looked on the house, but when we went shopping for a new roof we wanted a cedar shake alternative."

Dave Schwab

 

Project #2: Coastal Retreat

Most people would be envious of Robbin Torrey's home with sweeping Pacific Coast ocean views. The one blemish in her ideal home ... the original 51-year-old redwood shake tiles that were falling offer her roof. After doing her research, Torrey replaced her deteriorating roof with Multi-Width Shake from DaVinci Roofscapes in a Mountain blend color.

Synthetic Shake Roofing

"The DaVinci roofing material was of the best quality of all the products I reviewed. I liked the durability and appearance of the shake. Since my house is right on the coast, the fact that this synthetic shake tile has a wind resistance of 110 mph was very important to me."

Robbin Torrey

                                               

Project #3: Energy-Efficient EcoBlend Roof

When it came time to move from San Francisco to Pebble Beach, California, the Hines family fell in love with an abandoned 31-year-old home. It needed many replacements, including a new roof. They listened to their roofer, Denison Roofing, and selected an energy-efficient EcoBlend roof from DaVinci Roofscapes in Castle Gray-EcoBlend color. The roof meets Title 24 requirements, is ENERGY STAR® rated and meets the approval of the Cool Roof Rating Council to reflect sunlight and heat away from the home.

Environmentally friendly roof

"The old cedar shingles were in terrible shape. They were turned up like potato chips, falling off and rotting. We're glad we listened to our roofer. They did a terrific job and we love the new roof. Many of our neighbors have complemented it and we'd strongly recommend this good-looking, hard-working roofing product!"

Ray Hines

 

Project #4: Synthetic Slate On Stylish Home

Everyone knows the saying "Everything is Bigger in Texas" ... and the sprawling home of Jason Taylor is no exception. To complement his massive brick home and carport area, Taylor selected Bellaforté Slate roofing from DaVinci Roofscapes in Slate Gray.

Synthetic Slate Roof

"I liked the look and durability of the DaVinci product. The installer did a great job on the roof. If I had family members or friends looking for a new roof I'd highly recommend this roof and Huf Construction."

Jason Taylor

 

Project #5: Rebuilding After a Fire

Fire. A homeowner's worst nightmare. It happened recently to the Matthews family when a chimney fire caused by hot embers and ash that got through the spark arrestor and ignited the dry, combustible cedar shake roofing at the top of the chimney. Quick response by the fire department limited the damage, but a new roof was needed. The family chose a fire-resistant Bellaforté Shake roof from DaVinci Roofscapes in a Mountain VariBlend color.

Class a fire rated roof

"The lifetime limited warranty on the product plus the Class A Fire Rating are 90% of the reason behind our DaVinci selection. This synthetic shake roofing actually looks BETTER than real shake tiles. All of my neighbors were very anxious to see the finished roof and they have nothing but positive comments about it. I believe we'll see many more of these DaVinci roofs in our neighborhood in the coming years."

Ron Matthews

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Gambrel Roofs Give Dutch Colonials Their Quaint Charm

By Steven Randel, Houzz

What is a gambrel roof? Think of a shallow gable and a steep gable, then place the shallow atop the steep. Add dormers, often one long one, to the steep portion, and you have a configuration commonly referred to as Dutch colonial.

The gambrel structure allowed a wider roof span, which provided extra habitable space in the attic. This form evolved over several decades of adapting authentic 18th-century Dutch colonial architecture to the necessities of the time. Though simple gable roofs also sheltered some Dutch houses, the unique gambrel form became increasingly popular to the point of ethnic definition.

Limited to regions within and near New York's Hudson River Valley, colonial Dutch settlements eventually became outpaced by those of English colonists, who built their domestic architecture in Georgian and Adam styles. Dutch colonial houses we see today are actually revivals concurrent with colonial revival in general. Due to this, the gambrel roof has been shared and mixed across several styles, including shingle and Georgian. Conversely, classically inspired Georgian and Adam details often appear on Dutch colonial revival houses.

 

slate roof tiles

Siding & Windows Group Ltd, original photo on Houzz

 

You cannot venture too far before coming upon a house like this one. Dutch colonial revivals inhabit neighborhoods from coast to coast. They show up frequently, being a specific type among the long-lived colonial revival era that stretched from around 1880 until around 1955.

Focus on the quaint entrance here. An elliptical arch punctures the classically referenced pediment supported by decorative brackets. Sidelights extend halfway down, implying a halved Dutch door. Other traditional elements include clapboard siding, double-hung windows with shutters, window boxes and a frieze above each lower-level window. The defining roofline breaks apart the two-story house, giving it an intimate and human scale.

 

Slat roof shingles

Siding & Windows Group Ltd, original photo on Houzz

 

Similar in scale and detail to the previous example, this home has a continuous shed dormer that's defined by the extension of the upper roof form and stretches across nearly the entire elevation. Unique here is the eyebrow porch cover, a detail found in many examples. It extends slightly forward of the adjoining eave and inconspicuously signals the entrance. Also notice the double-hung windows with a divided light sash on top and a single-pane sash on the lower half. This detail is also seen in shingle-style homes.

 

slate shingles

Westover Landscape Design, Inc., original photo on Houzz

 

Moving up in size, this New York–area Dutch colonial revival maintains the inviting human scale inherent in this style. In true colonial revival fashion, windows are grouped into sets and sunrooms flank the lower levels. Significant here is the flare to the lowest eave line. This detail surfaced in original colonial designs; it was likely brought directly from the Netherlands. Notice how the shape of the front porch follows the fan light above the entrance door with sidelights and contrasts appropriately with the other linear elements.

Related: Easy Home Project: Replace Your Old Mailbox

Intersecting formations and other even more complex configurations show up in other styles, especially shingle. Consider the contrast in symmetry from the previous examples, and you can understand the association to shingle style. Substantial brackets support an attenuated flared eave that creates a front porch cover.

 

shake tile roof

Bill Ingram Architect, LLC, original photo on Houzz

 

Focus your attention on the primary gambrel roof section of this Alabama house. The stone body with parapet gambrels illustrates an important configuration in original Dutch colonial houses. Many Dutch colonists built with stone and likely brought the parapet design from the Netherlands. Contrasting hip roof appendages emphasize the prominent gambrel form here. Also note the bookend chimneys, another very nice allusion to Dutch originals. Independent shed dormers contrast previous examples.

 

tile roofs

Eskuche Design, original photo on Houzz

 

This comfortable new Minneapolis house has some contemporary twists on the gambrel roof theme. A large round arch set within a front-facing gambrel highlights the main entrance. The standing-seam metal roof of the wrapped porch and garage skirt contrast and emphasize the primary shingled portions of the roofs. Note the independent shed dormers and how the cross gambrel roof over the garage creates its own dormer impression.

Related: Make Your Home Glow With Updated Outdoor Lights

 

tile roofs

Tommy Chambers Interiors, Inc., original photo on Houzz

 

A gambrel roof establishes a focal point for this sprawling and elegant composition in Southern California. It has a complex balance of forms and elements blended unassumingly behind the gambrel. Notice the marvelously detailed lower-level triple window grouping happily topped by a Palladian window scheme, further emphasizing this focal point.

Whether modest or not so, the Dutch colonial gambrel roof shape has survived through several hundred years of American home-building fashions. The original gambrel provided extra habitable space, while contemporary versions are more flexible, offer greater visual interest and are a lovely homage to those pioneering Dutch colonists.

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DaVinci Roofscapes Lowers Product Pricing By Up to 16%

You read that headline correctly. At DaVinci Roofscapes, we've done something few other companies have ever done: we've LOWERED our pricing.

During the fourth quarter of 2016, our leadership team determined that we were experiencing manufacturing efficiencies that allowed us to save money --- and we decided to pass on those savings to you!

The price reductions range from 11 to 16 percent on several of our popular synthetic slate and imitation shake product lines.  

"We're going 'outside of the box' by sharing our cost savings to make our composite roofing products even more accessible to roofers and homeowners across the country," says Ray Rosewall, president and CEO for DaVinci Roofscapes. "We're exceptionally conscious of what the market is telling us versus what our competitors are doing. For us, it's all about advancing the growth of our customer's business.

"Most importantly, we've heard from distributors, roofers and builders that our products are becoming more preferred to the natural roofing products. People want the expected look of shake and slate, but they want the benefits that a manmade product offers. We've achieved that goal by creating realistic-looking products with exceptional features."

If you're thinking of investing in one of our designer roofs, don't let price concerns stop you. Just ask about the lower prices now available on our composite slate and synthetic slate roofing products! 

P.S. - Don't wait -- DaVinci Roofscapes Predicts Demand to Increase in 2017 for Synthetic Roofing!

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From the Tech Team: Step Flashing

Calling all roofing contractors! Today we want to talk to you about step flashing. Specifically step flashing with your Bellaforté Slate and Shake polymer roof systems.  A nuance of these products is that because of the way they are designed if you don’t use proper step flashing, which prevents water from running horizontally, the roof may not perform properly. From what we hear, a common hassle can be it is difficult to find step flashing with a return on it, or at the very least, a couple of bumps on it to assure that water doesn’t travel horizontally. To remedy this, DaVinci now sells step flashing just made just for Bellaforté!

Synthetic roofing product

Take a sneak peek at the new Bellaforté Slate Installation Guide coming out this March to learn more on how to install our custom made step flashing. As always, never hesitate to contact us for more information
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Featured Project - Plattsmouth, NE

Last summer, loyal DaVinci Roofscapes installer Weatherguard, Inc out of Omaha, NE replaced the roof on the historic Nebraska Masonic Home in Plattsmouth, NE.

Established in 1903, this facility offers assisted living and nursing care to about 100 residents. In 2016, they replaced the original slate roof with an impact resistant Bellaforté Slate roof tile in the Evergreen blend. Weatherguard, who has installed hundreds of DaVinci slate and shake roofs on homes and business in Nebraska, also installed copper flashings to keep the original look.

John Higgins Weatherguard, Inc
402-510-3867
www.rooferees.com


 

 

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Custom Roof Color Answers Church's Prayers

St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church in Kronborg, Neb. has been through some terrifying weather in its 118-year history. After straight-line winds and large hail struck the church, parsonage and fellowship hall in 2014, the congregation went in search of new siding, windows and roofing.

lightweight roofing tiles"Danish churches like ours are known for our red and white roofs, which tie back to the colors of the Danish flag and the heritage of our church," says Gene Hansen, a member of the St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church. "Those colors identify us. We knew we needed to replace the roof with a product that could help protect the church more in the future but still had those special colors."

Congregation members voted to install Bellaforté Shake roofing from DaVinci Roofscapes in a custom red color on both the church and the Fellowship Hall in 2016.

"The durability and beauty of this roof really spoke to the church members," says Nick Paschke, president of Paschke Brothers Construction. "The composite roofing answers so many challenges for this project. We were removing old wood shingles, metal and other roofing products. As we tackled the steepness of the steeple, the lightweight nature of the polymer roofing really helped us."

This Nebraska church isn't alone in relying on synthetic roofing tiles from DaVinci. See more church stories at Churches Thankful for Roofs Overhead and Impact-Resistant DaVinci Roof Tops Kansas Church.

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From the Tech Team: Two Nails for Bellaforté

Here is more good news from DaVinci! After extensive testing we have discovered that reducing the nails used for installing Bellaforté Slate or Shake from three nails to two does not impact wind performance. The only nails you need are one in the tab and one on the top right corner. By reducing the number of fasteners needed by 1/3, just think of the time and money that could be saved using this method. 
 
As usual there are a couple of exceptions to this.synthetic roofing material
 
1. This method is not yet approved by ICC, so if you install roofs in California or any other jurisdiction where the codes official adheres directly to our ICE-ESR 2119 you should use three nails.
 
2. In Florida or other coastal regions where you must comply with our Miami-Dade NOA you still will need to use five nails. 
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Banking on a DaVinci Synthetic Shake Roof

The Auburn Hills retail development in Wichita, Kansas is home to several storefront businesses, including a dentist, a chiropractor and a branch of KANZA Bank. To give Auburn Hills an updated look, DaVinci synthetic shake tiles were recently installed.

shake shingles"The previous concrete tile roof was installed in 2001," according to John E. Boyer, IV, chairman of the board at KANZA Bank out of Kingman, KS. "This community of businesses needed new roofing that would showcase the structures in a positive manner.

"We all did our homework before investing in DaVinci roofing. Heiland Roofing recommended the product and their referrals backed up the recommendation. The lighter weight of this polymer roof, matched up with the attractiveness of the product was a real win for us. They also had a variety of styles and colors for us to choose from and the 50 year limited warranty was very appealing."

For KANZA Bank and the other businesses at Auburn Hills, the durability of the roofing product was a key consideration. Midwest weather is never easy, and having a roof that can withstand high winds and snowfall means security and peace-of-mind for the business operators.

"Frankly, the attractiveness of the roof exceeded our expectations," says Boyer. "We've had numerous compliments on the roof from our customers, employees and other tenants. This DaVinci roof has really made the entire retail center stand out in the neighborhood."

TIP: Other banks have used composite roofing too ... click HERE to see how Tower Bank in Indiana used DaVinci polymer roofing!

 

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John Higgins Weatherguard Inc. Marks 400th DaVinci Roof

Hats off to the talented people at John Higgins Weatherguard Inc. out of Omaha, Nebraska. During the past 14 years, this company has registered more DaVinci Roofscapes roofing projects than any other roofing installation team in the country.

"I saw the DaVinci product for the first time at a trade show and loved the authentic look of the synthetic slate and shake roofing tiles," says Trent Lovewell with John Higgins Weatherguard Inc. "I love it even more now that we've had the opportunity to install it on hundreds of projects."

slate roof tiles

From the first ranch-style home the company installed a DaVinci roof on in 2002 to the 400th project in November of 2016, John Higgins Weatherguard Inc. has been a faithful DaVinci follower.

"Our 400th project was to reroof an old asbestos roof with Bellaforté Slate in a Slate Gray color," says Lovewell. "This was a steep roof that took several days to complete. Our team knows how to install this product. And, we know how to sell it --- we educate the homeowner about the maintenance-free aspects of the roof, combined with the impact resistance and the lifetime limited warranty. Those three features really 'close the deal' for us!"

From Omaha to Lincoln to Council Bluffs, Lovewell and his installers have covered hundreds of homes throughout Nebraska with DaVinci roofs over the years. (See Interview With Longtime Contractor, Trent Lovewell Of Weatherguard, Inc)

"The weather conditions in this area are a perfect match for DaVinci roofing," says Lovewell. "Mother Nature may throw hail or high winds our way, but this product is so well constructed it just laughs at the weather.

"Year after year I have customers coming back to thank me for the recommendation of a DaVinci roof. This is a product that really does hold up to its promise. We believe in the DaVinci product and anticipate roofing many, many more homes with it in the future."

Shake Tile Roof Shake Shingles

 

 

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Close Down the Insect Buffet

What's for lunch? If you're a termite or insect in the vicinity of a real cedar shake roof, a bountiful buffet awaits you!

shake roof tiles

While homeowners may like the "charm" of having a real cedar roof on their homes, these roofs come with many challenges. Cracking. Splitting. Growth of moss and algae. Fading. Shrinking. Curling. And, worst of all for some homeowners --- mold and insect infestations.

 

"I wanted something that looked like real wood shakes but performed better," says homeowner Thomas Meyers of Prior Lake, Minn. "I was tired of our older wood shakes deteriorating with different weather conditions. Plus, mold would accumulate on the wood shakes and the shakes were fading. Overall, dealing with this roof was a huge headache.

"After doing research on DaVinci Roofscapes and discussing the product with our contractor, we decided our best option was the Bellaforté Shake product that resists impact, wind, algae and mold."

Meyers isn't alone in his search for a "better" cedar shake. After severe hail damaged all 35 condo roofs at the Catawba Shores lakeside community, the homeowners association vowed not to let costly storm damage impact their homes again.

polymer shake“The hail damage caught us by surprise," says Jim Packard, president of the Catawba Shores Homeowners Association in Port Clinton, Ohio. "But we quickly learned that real wood shakes just don’t hold up against Mother Nature. The damage was so bad that our insurance company subsidized the cost of all the replacement roofs.”

After researching the community’s options, the Catawba Shores community committed to the man-made Bellaforté Shake roofing tiles and never looked back. Now on the community for five years, the synthetic shakes look as good as the day they were installed --- and there are no free lunches up on the roof for termites!

For more on the Catawba Shores project, see A New Roof ... Times 35 and Why You Should Care that DaVinci Polymer Roofs are Used on Condo Communities.

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From the Architect's Corner - Face-to-Face Continuing Education Available

Want to learn more about polymer roof products and receive a AIA credit for it? DaVinci Roofscapes is back to offering face-to-face continuing education. The course available, The Design Advantages of Synthetic Roofing Solutions, is an hour long presentation and is worth one HSW credit. During this course you will learn:

• List the green features of virgin-engineered polymer synthetic roofing materials.
• State the design and architectural benefits of specifying a synthetic roofing solution including how synthetic products can contribute to LEED® point certification.
• Compare the advantages and disadvantages of traditional roofing materials versus synthetic products.
• Discuss the durability and long life cycle of synthetic roofing materials including the various testing methods and approvals related to roofing materials.

If you are interested in scheduling an appointment with your local sales representative, contact me and I will put you in touch.

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Sunflower Travel Shakes Up Their Roof

At this time of year, who wouldn't want to escape to Hawaii, Jamaica or the Cayman Islands? Devin Hansen and his team at Sunflower Travel make those dreams come true.

Established in 1969, the Sunflower Travel location in Wichita, Kansas is ready to celebrate its first year anniversary with a Bellaforté Shake roof overhead. Installed in February of 2016, the Tahoe-VariBlend roof with four shades of brown, brings peace-of-mind to the team at Sunflower Travel --- both during winter weather and when the Kansas hail and winds kick up later in the year.

Cedar shake"The previous real wood shake shingle roof we had was 18 years old and in terrible shape," says Hansen, owner and president of Sunflower Travel. "We're part of an office complex with eight buildings so we needed a roof that would match up closely with the other roofs.

"When we first started exploring our re-roofing options there was a restriction in place that allowed only wooden shake shingles. The features and benefits of the DaVinci roof won over the Board that picks the roofing materials so we were able to invest in our first choice --- the Bellaforté Shake polymer roof.

"We chose this DaVinci product because it was the closest match to the existing roofs. The warranty was impressive and the low maintenance aspect very appealing to us."

While Sunflower Travel is currently the only building with a DaVinci roof, others in the complex will seek replacement roofs in the future --- and they're most likely to also select the Bellaforté Shake.

"Our new synthetic shake roof looks awesome," says Hansen. "Almost all the other building owners have remarked how close in color and style the new polymer roof looks compared to all the other structures that still have wooden shake shingles.

"By investing in this DaVinci roof we got exactly what we wanted: a product that looked like a real shake shingle but is more up-to-date and durable."

 

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What Roofing Products Roofers Recommend to Their Families

If you have a farmer in the family, you come to expect the best selections of vegetables and fruits on the dinner table. If your spouse is a travel agent, you may get some excellent deals on cruises. And, if you have a roofer in the family and find yourself in need of a new roof, you're certainly going to call the expert in the family for advice!

We recognize that everyone doesn't have a roofer in their family, so we're helping you out.

At DaVinci Roofscapes we sent this one question to several roofers and asked for their honest response. Here's the question ... and their answers.

Question: What would you tell a family member who asks your advice on a DaVinci roof versus asphalt, real wood shake, slate or stone coated steel?

 

Slate Tile Roof"Asphalt will only last 20 years. Wood shakes look great for five years, then start to weather and grow algae. Nothing compares to the look of a natural slate roof. They will last for 80 years, but you will pay for it up front --- almost double the cost of installing a DaVinci slate roof. Natural slate is very durable, but it will become brittle over time and more susceptible to hail impacts.

DaVinci roofing is priced between asphalt and slate. It has a higher fire rating than natural shakes and is more resistant to impacts than slate. And, DaVinci is hands down more aesthetically pleasing than stone coated steel options."

-Joe Whitmore, VP of Operations, Century Slate and Solar

 

"DaVinci will be the last roof you ever need ... it looks great!"

-Ken Bowman, Owner, Blue Ridge Roofing

 

"Roof installations most always come down to budgets. If your budget allows you to purchase a more expensive roof system that will outlast a lower costing roof by two to three times, a DaVinci roof is a great choice. It will give you longevity --- and actually at a lower cost than other expensive roofs --- as the lighter weight will save on structural framing costs.

Depending on your individual home and roof design, over time a DaVinci roof system can cost less than the two or three asphalt shingle roofs or the two cedar roofs that would need to be replaced over the lifespan when compared to DaVinci."

-Mark Dalrymple, President, Butcher & Butcher Construction Co., Inc.

 

"DaVinci has a natural look that comes with benefits of being lightweight, walkable, durable and having a very small amount of fade from sunlight."

-Hogan Hammarstrom, President and Founder, Absolut Roofing, Inc.

 

Interested in more roofer insights on synthetic slate roofing and synthetic shake shingles? See Roofers Applaud Lifespan & Looks of DaVinci Roofs and "Uncle Joe" Tells You About Roofing.

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Easy Living Lifestyle

In the Chestatee community (a golf and lake neighborhood in Dawsonville,Georgia) just north of metro Atlanta, custom homes are designed and constructed specifically to create an "ease of living" lifestyle.

fake cedar shakeFor homeowners Dave and Karen Compretta (and Edie Nichols, Karen’s mother who has an English cottage on the property), they wanted that easy lifestyle to start at the roof and go all the way down their home façade. That's why they selected manufactured stone for their home exterior along with composite shake siding accents. And, for their roof, they chose authentic shake shingles from DaVinci Roofscapes. (See also Bellaforté Shake Shingles = Peace of Mind)

"Basically, we're done with outside maintenance on our home," says homeowner Dave Compretta. "There's a lifetime limited warranty on this roof ... and we expect it to well outlast our lifetime! Let the grandkids deal with the warranty someday in the future. Right now, we're enjoying our no-maintenance style of living!"

Constructed in mid-2016, the Arts-and-Crafts style home the Comprettas moved into was roofed by Braswell Construction. Originally the subdivision leadership restricted roofing materials to natural cedar or pine shakes ... until they saw the genuine-looking polymer shakes from DaVinci.

"This product sold itself," says Compretta. "We knew the cost would be slightly higher, but with no maintenance (and, in our opinion this actually looks better than real wood shakes), it was a no brainer."

The Comprettas are so pleased with their new roof that they invite others in the neighborhood and north Georgia to visit and see the roofing product up close. According to the Comprettas, "We're confident that when people see our home with mother's in-law cottage and then understand the long-term benefits of the DaVinci roof, they'll make the smart decision to invest in a similar roof for their lifetime of easy living!"

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The Components of a Roof Every Homeowner Should Know

By Bud Dietrich, Houzz

After you've installed your foundation, put down your floor structure and erected your walls, it's time to build your roof — one of the most important architectural elements. In fact, from the colonial home with its gable roof to a Prairie-style home with its hip roof, from a modern home with its low-sloping roof to an elegant mansard on an urban townhouse, we can't imagine a house style that doesn't have its associated roof configuration. Aligning the roof shape and configuration with the overall aesthetic you're after is essential to getting the look you want.

Related: Design Dictionary: The Lingo of Rooftops

A roof also has an impact on the interior. Simply put, if all of the interior rooms have a flat ceiling of the same height, you can save time and money and have the roof built with manufactured trusses. If you're looking for some ceiling height variety and a vaulted ceiling in some rooms, you'll likely go with a stick-built roof that allows for this kind of flexibility. Or you can combine these two approaches to save time and money where possible while getting those special spaces you want.

Here are the different parts of a simple roof structure, how they come together and how they impact the interior spaces.

 


Bud Dietrich, AIA, original photo on Houzz

 

A simple, stick-built triangular roof structure has three main components.

First, there's a ridge board, which is a horizontal wood element at the peak of the roof, establishing the apex of the roof's triangle.

Next are the rafters, which are fastened to the ridge board and slope downward to the exterior walls. The rafters do the heavy lifting for a roof structure. While resisting the downward force of gravity, the sloping rafters also provide the means by which the house sheds water, keeping the interiors dry and habitable.

Last are the ceiling joists, which also act as ties. While the rafters resist the downward force of gravity, the ceiling joists will resist any outward thrust. Just think of it like this: The rafters, having stood up to gravity, want to take a rest and lie down. But if they were allowed to, they would push the exterior walls outward — not a good thing. The ceiling joists won't let this happen; they just keep pulling the walls back in.

 


Bud Dietrich, AIA, original photo on Houzz

 

An important design consideration is where to locate the ceiling joists, or rafter ties. These don't have to be set at the top of the exterior wall; they can be set higher up, allowing for a taller ceiling.

What's important is that the rafter ties be placed in the lower third of the overall roof structure height. This makes sense, as most of the outward thrusting action these ties are designed to resist is located lower in the roof structure, closer to where the rafters meet the exterior walls.

Setting the ceiling joists higher like this is, with the addition of some framing at the room ends, also the method used to create a tray ceiling.

 


Bud Dietrich, AIA, original photo on Houzz

 

Let's say you want a really tall vaulted ceiling for a large great room. If this is the case, you'll want to get rid of the rafter ties altogether and replace the thin and light ridge board with a heavier and stronger ridge beam.

The rafters will get securely fastened to this ridge beam so that the whole assembly will resist the outward thrust of the rafters. And because these ridge beams can be quite massive, they become a distinctive architectural element in their own right.

 


Bud Dietrich, AIA, original photo on Houzz

 

Another roof element, though not a common one, is the purlin. This is a board that spans rafters, or trusses, providing a way to fasten the roof sheathing and subsequent roofing materials.

Purlins were traditionally used when the rafters were placed farther apart to save on materials in utilitarian buildings such as barns. But purlins have become popular in residential construction because of their unique architectural look. In fact, using purlins will create the illusion that the actual ceiling floats above the rafters, something that can be architecturally distinctive.

 


Bud Dietrich, AIA, original photo on Houzz

 

Last but not least are manufactured trusses made of 2-by-4 (sometimes 2-by-6) lumber and metal connecting plates. Trusses such as these are used quite often on large tract developments due to the efficiency of their repetitive design.

But these trusses are also used in custom construction too, as they can be a great way to save time and money. Even with a complex roof shape, trusses can be engineered and built on a made-to-order basis. And because of the efficient use of material and less waste generated when they're built in a factory, manufactured trusses can be a more sustainable way to build.

Related: 7 Steps in Building a New Home

One caveat about a house built with these types of trusses: A roof built with manufactured trusses is more difficult to modify than a comparable stick-built roof. So if your home has ceilings all the same height and a truss-built roof, you'll find it more difficult to open rooms up and get that tall ceiling you want for that new great room. Be sure to get help from an architect or engineer before you modify the roof structure.

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Custom Home Deserves Custom DaVinci Roof

Noel Etzel had a "do it once, do it right" philosophy he followed when making product selections for his family's custom home last year in Topeka, Kansas. That theory led him to select Bellaforté Shake roofing to top off his 6,400-square-foot contemporary mountain style home.

Bellaforte Shake

"We wanted a roofing product that would look like real shake without the issues associated with shake roofs," says Etzel. "To that end, we wanted to make a roofing selection only one time, so the DaVinci product was ideal. After seeing some local installations of the synthetic shake product, we were sold on it.

"For us, the fact that there is color variation between the individual polymer shake shingles adds to the 'realism' of the roof and makes it look very natural."

Designed by NSPJ Architects, the Etzel home boasts real stone pillars and wood planking on the exterior. The custom home was designed by Timothy Homburg, AIA, NCARB, Principal Architect and Co-President at NSPJ Architects, to include a four-season room with a fireplace, steam room, theatre, dumbwaiter from the main floor kitchen to a walk-out summer kitchen and outdoor pool.

"My favorite part of the exterior design of the home is the screened porch that opens up the entire back of the house to the lake view," says Homburg. "Our custom residential designs are well thought out and evoke our client's personality and lifestyle. As in the case of the Etzel family, we listen and are attentive to our client's needs. So, when the Etzels said they wanted an easy-care, authentic-looking faux cedar shake roof, we thought of the DaVinci product. We've used this synthetic roofing product successfully on other projects for our firm and believed it would be a good match for this home design."

Bellaforte Shake

To gain a "top down" flow of cohesive color on the home exterior, the Etzels worked with Appelhanz Roofing to select the Mountain-VariBlend color combination of varying tones of browns for their Bellaforté Shake roof. "After comparing several DaVinci color samples to our stone work, cedar siding and trim, the Mountain-VariBlend was the best fit for our home," says Etzel. "Overall we're extremely happy with the exterior of the house and we can't think of anything we would change.

"While some might think it's hard to get excited about something as simple and necessary as a roof, we feel otherwise. We routinely receive positive feedback on the roof and are extremely pleased with our decision to invest in the DaVinci product."

Interested in a custom color for your custom home? See 3 Reasons A Custom Color Could Be The Best Choice For Your Project.

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