Steeple People

Churches all across the country with eye-catching steeples often refer to themselves as "steeple people." These days the term should probably be changed to "synthetic steeple people."

Steep Slope RoofingThat's because many churches, looking for attractive, low-maintenance coverings for their steeples, are turning to synthetic roofing material from DaVinci Roofscapes.

In Ohio, Seville Presbyterian Church is the latest place of worship to select composite roofing for their steeple. The 3,000-pound, 27-foot tall steeple sits atop a 15-foot, two-piece base. The refurbished steeple now boasts a white custom color DaVinci Multi-Width Slate roof, allowing it to remain a focal point in the community.

While impressive, the Seville Presbyterian Church steeple appears dwarfed when compared to the soaring 86-foot tall steeple at the Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Centennial, Colorado. This steeple was recently refurbished with DaVinci Multi-Width Shake in the Autumn blend to complement the church's design and setting. (see Unique Design Uses DaVinci Roofscapes Shake on Top and Sides of Colorado Church)

"We selected the DaVinci products for the steeple and roof because of their aesthetics and resistance to impact and hail," says Jim Wolfe, a 30-year member of the church. "Because our previous roofs were destroyed in hail storms we placed special emphasis on finding a top-quality roofing product that would have a 50-year limited warranty. We don't want to deal with this issue again in our lifetimes."

From specialty "onion shaped" domes covered in simulated shake roofing atop the Sacred Heart Ukrainian Catholic Church in New York (see Polymer Shake Roof Accents Ukrainian Church ) to our imitation slate shingles on the chapel at the Dayton Veterans Administration Medical Center in Ohio (see Contractors Go to Church with DaVinci Roofscapes), at DaVinci Roofscapes we're definitely embracing the term "steeple people!"

            


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