Tour de Roofs

Thousands of cyclists are currently spending 21 days pedaling their way through France as part of the Tour de France. Unfortunately they're mostly looking straight ahead and concentrating on their route. What a shame.

If these dedicated cyclists looked up, they'd be in for quite a treat.

During my recent trip to France I had the opportunity see some truly beautiful roofs. While my fellow travelers were oohing and aahing over the countryside, my camera was pointed upwards at these incredibly historic roofs.

My favorite was the very colorful designer roof at Hotel-Dieu in Beaune. Founded in 1443, this structure was actually built as a hospital. The medieval jewel boasts geometric, multi-colored Burgundian roof tiles. It reminded me so much of the custom color capabilities available from DaVinci Roofscapes that I could easily imagine replicating the roof in the United States!

 

More sedate roofs also caught my attention in France. Everywhere you turned there were turrets and structures covered mostly with old clay tiles. Slate roofs are also popular in France, as are concrete spires that top structures such as the impressive Palais des Papes (Palace of the Popes) in Avignon. Constructed in 1309, there are ten towers in the fortress that spans more than 148,000 square feet!

 

For a vacation trip with lots of roof-appeal, I've got to say, Vive la France!

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New Imitation Slate Roof Atop Grace Episcopal Church

After almost 100 years atop Grace Episcopal Church in Mansfield, Ohio, the heavy original slate tile roof was replaced in late 2014 with lightweight polymer roofing tiles from DaVinci Roofscapes.

Polymer Slate Roof"We would categorize the original slate as in poor to average condition," says Roman Koval, business manager at Cleveland Commercial Roofing. "This was a soft slate that was costing thousands of dollars each year for the church in upkeep. Selecting the durable DaVinci Single-Width Slate profile was a sound investment for this historic building."

DaVinci synthetic slate roofing tiles are carefully crafted using virgin resins to guarantee a sustainable roofing product. The 12" wide tiles are modeled after actual slate and resist impact, severe weather and are Class A Fire Rated. Backed by a Lifetime Limited Materials Warranty, the simulated slate roofing offer the church decades of easy maintenance care.

"Our church dealt with the high mounting costs of maintaining our real slate roof for many years," says Rev. Joe Ashby with Grace Episcopal Church. "The slate needed constant attention and wasn't energy efficient. After we saw the authentic appearance of the DaVinci product, we knew we'd found the solution to our problem."

The aesthetic appeal of the DaVinci roof boasts an authentic quarried look to replicate genuine slate roof tiles. "Those people who don't know we had the church re-roofed still think we have the slate roof --- that's how realistic the slate appearance is of the polymer roofing product," says Ashby. "We're exceptionally happy with our choice of DaVinci and have already recommended it to another church in our area."

See also Churches Thankful for Roofs Overhead for more churches across the country using synthetic slate shingles and cedar shake roofing from DaVinci.

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History Repeats Itself --- With DaVinci Composite Roofing

There's a saying that history repeats itself. At DaVinci Roofscapes, we've adapted that saying to: Historic roofs CAN repeat themselves!

Since it's National Historic Preservation Week, we want to share some of our favorite roofing projects that have involved historic buildings getting replacement composite roofing to replicate their past original roofs.

> First Presbyterian Church of Jacksonville, Oregon - 1881 church replaced decaying cedar shake shingles with DaVinci Shake in Tahoe blend after the town's Historic Architectural Review Committee approved the DaVinci synthetic shake tiles.

Fake Shake

 

> Peterson House in Durango, Colorado - 1880s home located at the Animas Museum site chose Fancy Shake composite shake in Mountain Blend after the original milled wood roof shingles crumbled.

Cedar Shake Alternative

 

> Telecky Home in Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas - 1914 home had original wooden cedar shake roofing, covered up over the years with several layers of asphalt shingles. The homeowners wanted historically-accurate cedar shake shingles and chose DaVinci Multi-Width polymer roofing in Slate Gray for their designer roof.

Fake Slate

 

> St. Paul's Cathedral and Parish House in Oklahoma City - The 1904 Norman-Gothic church structure was badly damaged in the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. A DaVinci composite slate roof in fire brick red was added to the church as part of the rebuilding effort.

Slate Tile Roof
 

Can't get enough of historic roofs? Then see Museum Rooftops and Historical Sites Rely on Polymer Roofing.

 

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From the Architect's Corner - Accent Stripes

It isn't an architectural detail you see everyday, but occasionally a historic project will call for a stripe of a contrasting color in a course of synthetic slate roof tiles. These last few weeks I have spent some time with an architect discussing this very detail for a historic project he is working on where he is working to match a quarried slate roof on the same block. Luckily, I have some examples to show of this detail on projects previously installed. Between our slate and shake product lines we have 50 individual colors to choose from, giving endless possibilities for accent rows, or something more elaborate, to be built in.

  

 

Happy Friday, Architects! 

 

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Historic Homes Get Contemporary Polymer Roofing

When Kevin and Nancy Dye purchased their 1929 historic home in Virginia, they did so knowing a new roof was in their future.

Fake Slate RoofThe home originally sported a red Mediterranean tile roof, but it had been replaced by an artificial black slate roof that that the homeowners disliked.

 “We did an extensive amount of research on roofing materials and searched for a realistic and durable slate product," says homeowner Nancy Dye. "The result is a DaVinci Roofscapes Multi-Width Slate roof that we love. We brightened up the home’s exterior by selecting the Vineyard blend of eight different colors --- dark and medium tan, light and medium gray, light and dark violet, dark stone and dark amber. This color combination fits the era of the home and complements our cobblestone driveway and sidewalk, the stone exterior of the house and our copper gutters and snow guards.”

 

Half way across the country in Texas, the Telecky family faced the same challenge of replacing the roof on their historic 1914 home.

Slate Roof Alternative“The home originally had wooden shake shingles, which were covered up over the years with several layers of asphalt shingles,” says homeowner Kathy Telecky. “We discovered that only the polymer roof tiles produced by DaVinci Roofscapes are uniquely designed to resist warping, fading, curling and cracking. And, these polymer tiles are fire and impact resistant, so we never have to worry about how our intense Texas heat or hail storms will affect them.”
 
The Telecky family is pleased with their new imitation slate roof. “The roofing tiles never look like plastic," says Telecky. "Right from the start they looked very natural with their understated slate gray color. This so accurately resembles real slate that we’re completely delighted with its beauty. Now we’re the envy of the neighborhood and our roof is ready for any weather we face in Texas!”

See Roof Envy - A Tale of Two Roofs and Homeowners Talk About DaVinci Roofscapes for more homeowner insights on composite roofing from DaVinci!

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DaVinci Roofscapes Goes to Court

Look up at the historic Carroll County Courthouse in Carrollton, Ohio and you think you're seeing natural slate roof tiles on the rooftop. But, it's not.

Fake Slate RoofIn 2014 a re-roofing project was completed by Architectural Roofing Contractors, Inc. on the 1885 courthouse that now boasts Bellaforté Slate roofing in the European-VariBlend color blend.

"The DaVinci Roofscapes product was one of three presented to us along with slate and metal," says Ed Eick, building maintenance supervisor for Carroll County. "I found the DaVinci product to be very affordable to us along with being cost effecting in long-term maintenance."

The European VariBlend colors of Light Gray, Medium Gray, Dark Gray and Dark Purple was chosen because the color blend reminded Eick of the natural slate roofing materials already on the roof. This similarity helped the county retain its designation as a U.S. National Register of Historic Places site.

"I found it to be very appealing that the DaVinci product is 100 percent recyclable," says Eick. "Knowing that there are county offices that urge recycling, that in itself made sense that the county courthouse should be a good example of county officials looking out for the environment."

The results gained a big thumbs-up from Eick and the county commissioners. "Architectural Roofing Contractors did an excellent job and I made sure their company knew it," says Eick. "The roofers on the job said the product was nice to work with and easily installed. We have a roof and gutter system that will last us for years to come, hassle-free."

Carroll County isn't the only community to rely on composite roofing from DaVinci. See Downtown Vail A “City of DaVinci Roofs”

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A Day ... or Night ... at the Museum

We have two great ways to celebrate today --- which is National Museum Day!

Start with a visit to a local museum to explore the mysteries that lie within ... and then end the day with a trip to the theatre to see the recently-released Night at the Museum movie.

If you're fortunate enough to live in the Chicago area, we encourage you to visit the DuSable Museum. The first African American museum campus in the United  States, DuSable includes the 66,000-square foot historic Roundhouse that was originally built in the early 19th century.

Made of Joliet limestone, the structure was restored in recent years and now features DaVinci Roofscapes synthetic slate roofing overhead.

"The DaVinci multi-width slate roofing tiles look amazing on the Roundhouse," says Sarah Delezen, senior project manager for the Alter Group. "The structure's original roof was made of slate, so we were pleased that these polymer roof tiles have the texture and subtle variations of color that make them appear historically accurate. The Castle Gray blend of colors in the imitation slate roof perfectly offsets the copper gutters on this structure."

Bill Latoza, LEED AP and founding principal with Bauer Latoza Studio in Chicago specified the DaVinci composite roofing products for the Roundhouse roof. "For me, the real selling point was the varied color selection of the DaVinci blends because it didn't make the roof look monochromatic," says Latoza. "Combined with the larger profile that allows for a strong shadow line, these synthetic slate roof tiles are ideal for historic preservation projects.

"Another reason we sought out DaVinci is because they have green-friendly building products that complement the historical integrity of the Roundhouse. At the same time, these tiles are easy-to-maintain and offer long-term benefits for the future of the structure. We're pleased with these tiles and I'll be specifying them again in the future for other historic preservation projects."

The restored Roundhouse doubles the available space for DuSable Museum, which is dedicated to the collection, preservation, interpretation and dissemination of the history and culture of Africans and Americans of African descent. See  for more synthetic shake and imitation slate tiles roofing stories!

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Wedding Guest: DaVinci Polymer Slate Roof

Bridal veils and scaffolding don't mix well. That's why, when the popular Addison Oaks - Buhl Estate in Leonard, Michigan needed a new roof, the installation had to be scheduled during the winter months.

"Approximately 30,000 guests visit our historic venue yearly," says Dan Shaw with Oak Management, which manages the manor. "We have hundreds of weddings in our English Tudor-style manor home each year, so the roof had to go up during our slower winter months."

Royal Roofing in Orion, Michigan was up to the challenge. They recommended and installed a Multi-Width Slate lightweight roofing solution from DaVinci Roofscapes during the early winter months of 2014.

"The previous roof tile was a violet/pink color that we were able to match with a violet-colored DaVinci imitation slate roof," says Tim Frisch, project manager with Royal Roofing. "The DaVinci product was specifically chosen because it provided the look of the original roof on the building and has a 50 year roof warranty."

Scaffolding surrounded the 1927 vintage building as the Royal Roofing team went to work. The uniquely-styled building has nine chimneys, a series of low-sloped dormers, an entrance turret and a variety of gables. "Our men loved the workability of the synthetic slate shingles," says Frisch. "We had no problems at all with the installation and we're recommending it for other residential and commercial projects in our area."

Slate Alternative

 

Completed on schedule despite heavy snowfall and chilly temperatures, the new roof now enhances the destination venue. "What has been most intriguing since the renovation is the amount of time people spend gazing at all the copper craftsmanship and the new shake tile roof," says Shaw. "Guests seem mesmerized as they walk up to the building. It's fun to watch!

"We have the picture-perfect setting for weddings and other special occasions. Now, thanks to DaVinci and Royal Roofing, those pictures just got better!"

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Featured Project - Waukegan, IL

The Haines House, located in Waukegan, IL, is one of the oldest surviving buildings in Lake County. Formerly the home of past Chicago mayor John C. Haines, it currently houses the Waukegan History Museum and services as the headquarters for the Waukegan Historical Society. DaVinci Shake shingles were chosen for the museum as a maintenance free way to keep the historical look of the building. The polymer roof tiles were installed by high-end contractor All American Exterior Solutions, located out of Lake Zurich, IL. 

This luxury roof system, not only looks just like natural cedar shake, but it comes with a 50 Year Warranty, Class A Fire Rating, Class 4 Impact Rating, and a 110 mph wind rating


All American Exterior Solutions
847-438-4131

To see more featured projects, please visit:

 

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History in the Making

Most historic project makeovers you read about focus on structures that are hundreds of years old. But in Johnson City, New York, the Sacred Heart Ukrainian Catholic Church is just 37 years old, yet it promises to be written up in future history books.

That's because the traditional Ukrainian design of the church structure includes three massive domes. Each one is 80-feet tall --- and each one is covered in our single-width Valoré composite shake roofing material from DaVinci Roofscapes.

 

Church founders selected the Tuscano blend of light, medium light, medium and dark autumn colors to top their unique church structure. The shake alternative roofing product was selected after the original cedar shake roof deteriorated.

"We're both amazed and pleased that these man-made roofing tiles could have such a positive and beautiful impact on our facility," says Rev. Teodor B. Czabala, Jr. "The new polymer shakes look almost identical to the older wooden ones, but these will last so much longer."

Valoré synthetic shake roofing tiles embrace the art and science of roofing and offer exceptional aesthetics and performance without destroying a budget. The synthetic cedar shake tiles resemble the hand-split shake tiles found on upscale residences throughout the world, but require none of the maintenance.

Available in 9-inch tile widths with a deep 5/8" profile shadow line, Valoré lightweight roofing tiles are Class 4 impact-rated, rated Class A for fire resistance and won't support the growth of fungus or algae. This 50 year roof offers exceptional value for any residential or commercial project. And that's a lesson for the history books!

For information on synthetic roofing material used on other churches, visit Churches Thankful for Roofs Overhead.

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From the Architect's Corner - Museum Rooftops

May 18th was National Museum Day, so it seems fitting to feature a museum project in today's blog. The Waukegan History Museum, also known as the Haines House named after former Chicago mayor John C. Haines, was built in 1843 and is not only one of the oldest surviving buildings in Lake County, but is the current headquarters to the Waukegan, IL Historical Society. 

DaVinci Shake, our multi-width composite shake tiles featured here in the Weathered Gray Blend, was the roof chosen for his historic building and museum. The tiles come in five widths, 9", 8", 7", 6" & 4" and in six color blends, pre-sorted in the factory for size and for color. The authenticity of this product allowed the historical society for this community to keep the look required for this building, without the maintenance and problems of natural cedar shake. Click here if you are interested in seeing more examples of DaVinci Roofscapes' polymer roof tiles featured on museums. 

Happy Friday, Architects! 

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Happy National Museum Day!

In honor of National Museum Day, we want to share with you one of our favorite DaVinci Roofscapes re-roofing projects --- the Roundhouse at DuSable Museum in Chicago. This unique museum is dedicated to the collection, preservation, interpretation and dissemination of the history and culture of Africans and Americans of African descent.

After a proud history that includes serving as a horse stable during the 1893 World’s Fair, the Roundhouse at DuSable Museum was restored in 2011. Originally built in the early 19th century, the structure’s round shape is made of Joliet limestone and is now topped by a DaVinci Roofscapes polymer slate roof.

The 66,000-square foot Roundhouse and the adjoining buildings are home to a library, café, galleries, technology and language lab, museum store and educational spaces.

“The DaVinci multi-width slate roofing tiles look amazing on the Roundhouse," says Sarah Delezen, senior project manager for the Alter Group. "The structure’s original roof was made of slate, so we were pleased that these composite slate tiles have the texture and subtle variations of color that make them appear historically accurate. The Castle Gray blend of colors in the fake slate roof perfectly offsets the copper gutters on this structure.”

Bill Latoza, LEED AP and founding principal with Bauer Latoza Studio in Chicago specified the DaVinci manufactured slate tiles for the Roundhouse roof. “For me, the real selling point was the varied color selection of the DaVinci blends because it didn’t make the roof look monochromatic,” says Latoza. “Combined with the larger profile that allows for a strong shadow line, these synthetic slate roof tiles are ideal for historic preservation projects.

“Another reason we sought out DaVinci is because they have green-friendly building products that complement the historical integrity of the Roundhouse. At the same time, these tiles are easy-to-maintain and offer long-term benefits for the future of the structure. We’re pleased with these simulated slate roofing tiles and I’ll be specifying them again in the future for other historic preservation projects.”

For more museum stories featuring lightweight roofing tiles from DaVinci, see Museum Rooftops.

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Contractors Go to Church with DaVinci Roofscapes

CHALLENGE:

Almost 140 years after it was built, the chapel at the Dayton Veterans Administration Medical Center in Ohio needed a new roof. The original roof, constructed out of slate, boasted a large cross with a star-studded border in light colors on the background of black slate. The current roof structure of the chapel couldn't support the weight of real slate, so DaVinci Roofscapes synthetic slate shingles were specified.

SOLUTION:

Twenty-seven squares of medium tan imitation slate tiles and 67 squares of black composite slate tiles were ordered by Detroit Cornice and Slate Company in Michigan to complete both sides of the roof plus the steeple and vestibules.

“Working with a 7-1/2-inch exposure and 9-inch wide field tiles, it was important that the vertical and horizontal band dimensions come out looking the same width," says Dawn Hesse, project manager at Detroit Cornice and Slate Company. "The client also wanted the vertical line of the cross to be completely straight. However, it is not recommended to create a ‘slot on slot’ configuration with any roofing.”

To solve the challenge, Detroit Cornice blended together different widths of DaVinci polymer roofing tiles in 6-, 9- and 12-inch sizes to come as close as possible to creating the cross while maintaining the warranty. A chalk outline of the pattern was sketched on the roofing felt for the installation crews to follow.

According to Hesse, another big challenge facing the team on the chapel project was gaining a full understanding of the roof’s original design.

“We’re experts in slate and flashing details, and knew that this project would require careful pre-construction planning,” says Hesse. “Multiple layouts were created and reviewed by all members of the team. It was a time-consuming process that required patience and input from everyone involved. A variety of roofing tile colors, sizes and patterns were considered

"Overall, the coordinated efforts needed to make this project happen were a key to its success. Part of that success was due to the support we received from DaVinci, as well as providing one of the better looking synthetic slate products on the market today.”

To see another DaVinci project where lightweight roofing tiles offered a solution to a problem, visit SRA Architects Specify DaVinci Polymer Roof for New LeConte Center at Pigeon Forge.

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History Repeats Itself … With DaVinci Roofing Tiles

The second week of May is National Historic Preservation Week --- and at DaVinci Roofscapes, this is a celebration we really support!

Many historic restoration projects nationwide feature green roofing options from DaVinci, including DuSable Museum, Printers Union Home, Animas Museum and St. Clement Church.

One of our favorite residential projects involves the replacement of a roof on a 111-year-old Queen Anne style home in Vinton, Iowa.

Homeowners Carol and Ray Knoff had previously found a 300-year-old roof tile from a historic home in Des Moines. They decided to replicate the red to gray roof coloring and came to DaVinci Roofscapes for assistance.

“We knew we’d need a top-quality roofing manufacturer to custom create the color for the slate tiles on our home so we started to research options,” says homeowner Carol Knoff. “All of our investigative work brought us to DaVinci Roofscapes. The team there worked with us to develop a color combination of Midnight Gray and Cottage Red that really ‘pops’ and gives a positive first impression of our home while helping define the roof lines and architectural style.”

For the complex, multi-pitch roof areas of their home, the Knoffs selected Bellaforté Slate polymer tiles. The tiles feature a patented fastening system for precise installation and superior wind performance. The 12-inch slate Bellaforté roofing tiles, which are backed by a 50-year limited warranty, have achieved some of the strictest testing ratings in the country, including the Miami Dade Notice of Acceptance (NOA) and Florida Building Code (FBC) qualifications.

A portion of the Knoff’s historical home features a three-story tower with a music and sitting room on the top floor, capped with an old-fashioned turret. DaVinci Multi-Width Slate was installed on the cone-shaped portion of the roof to both accent the turret and complement the single-width Bellaforté Slate used on the majority of the home.

“It’s wonderful to now have this new custom color polymer slate tile on our roof," says Knoff. "The bold custom colors created by DaVinci give the house a unified look that complements the detail work of the house trim, siding and stone pathways.”

DaVinci Faux Slate Roofing a Favorite for Historic Restoration Projects gives you more details on designer roof solutions from DaVinci!

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Impact-Resistant DaVinci Roof Tops Kansas Church

The roof on the Woodland United Methodist Church in Wichita, Kansas has been replaced many times in the past 103 years. Most recently, hail damage in August of 2012 demanded a new roof be placed on the sanctuary, fellowship hall, steeple and portico.

"The Bellaforté Shake polymer roof tiles from DaVinci Roofscapes are a long-term roofing solution for this church," says Kendall R. Zielke, commercial estimator and project manager for Midwest Roofing Services. "We've installed this composite shake product successfully on other projects in our area that are also subject to our severe weather conditions and always have good results. Since this is an impact-resistant synthetic shake tile with a 50-year roof warranty, we believe this shake alternative is ideal for the church structure."

Church leaders selected the Tuscano blend of four autumn brown colors as the roofing color option that most resembled the previous wood shakes on the stone church. "This shake alternative so closely resembles our former roof that I don't think many members even know this is a synthetic shake roofing material," says Jim Brown, a member of the Board of Trustees at the church. "Unless you get very close, you can't tell that there are 'fake cedar shakes' on our roof."

Bellaforté Shake composite roofing tiles include a leading edge tab and a self-aligning ledge, which help reduce the installation time for the products. "The snap-fit aspect of the Bellaforté is a great feature of this product," says Zielke. "In addition, a square of Bellaforté tiles weighs just 190 pounds. This lower tile weight helps reduce our installation time and allows us to get the job done faster for our clients."

See Historic Church Gets High-Tech Polymer Roof for another success story on DaVinci imitation slate roofs on churches.

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Historic Home Gets DaVinci Polymer Slate Roof

When roofer Troy Brown got involved in the re-roofing project of a 1921 home in Lynchburg, Va., he was in for quite a history lesson. The house was designed by architect Stanhope Johnson in 1918 and required massive renovation work by the new homeowner to bring it back to its original beauty.

After tackling the interior wiring, plumbing and plastering, the homeowner next turned to the exterior. Repairs were made to the woodwork and eaves extending from the house that help hold up the roof.

When it came time to select an authentic-looking replacement roof, the homeowner relied on Brown and his team for their recommendation of DaVinci Roofscapes polymer slate tiles. "The slate black composite roofing tiles really complement the style of the house design, which is a fusion of French Cottage and California Bungalow," says Brown with W.A. Lynch Roofing. "We've successfully installed the DaVinci luxury roof products previously, so I was confident this would be a good product for this historic renovation."

Slate Roof Shingles

 

According to Brown, the unique roof design features a large eyebrow shape blended into the front elevation roofline. "Because DaVinci offers multiple sizes of product we were able to create a random pattern for the roof that works perfectly with the overall style of the home," says Brown. "A good number of Stanhope's building and home designs are on the National Register of Historic Places, so we really felt compelled to make certain this roof was done perfectly so that the homeowner can pursue a historic designation for his home in the future."

With the roof now complete, the home renovation continues with plans to replace the back deck with iron decking, custom railings and a rear retaining wall. "The new roof truly sets this house apart in the neighborhood with its copper work and downspouts," says Brown. "The DaVinci slate roof alternative turned out absolutely stunning. This roofing product has added character and beauty to the home and makes us really see Stanhope's original design vision turn into reality."

See Vintage Home Gets Custom-Color Roof for another historic home showcase featuring DaVinci lightweight roofing systems.

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Check Out DaVinci Roofs on Hotels

Before you check into to your next hotel room, check out the roof overhead. You may be surprised to discover it's made of DaVinci Roofscapes polymer roof tiles.

While guests checking into the 48-room Beach Terrace Inn hotel in Carlsbad, California may initially be drawn to the oceanfront views, their gaze soon wanders to the fully-renovated hotel itself. And, that’s when they’re likely to notice the structure’s unique design and low-pitch roof covered in imitation slate.

When renovating the oceanfront hotel, the owners searched for a low-maintenance roof that could hold up to both the salt air and the harsh rays of the sun. They also wanted an eco friendly roof that would add to the overall design of the structure. After extensive research, they selected a DaVinci synthetic slate roof in an Aberdeen blend of stone, gray, brown, green and purple shades. The fake slate was ideal for the hotel since it resists fire, impact and high winds sometimes found in California.

Across the country in Atlanta's prestigious Buckhead section is the five-star St. Regis Hotel. And, sitting atop the roof of the hotel’s famous Paces 88 American Bistro restaurant are weather-resistant simulated slate roofing tiles from DaVinci Roofscapes.

“We got the call in early 2009 that the St. Regis wanted to add a small one-story addition to the front of its property to house a café-type restaurant to the right of the main entrance,” says Todd Spencer, president/architect at Spencer Roofing & Construction, Inc. in Kennesaw, Ga. “The goal was for the roof addition to complement the roof on the main section of this prestigious hotel. This desire immediately brought DaVinci products to mind.

“We installed 15 squares of 12-inch DaVinci Dark Green authentic slate tiles in a mansard application on this restaurant roof. The match is ideal. When the doors opened to the 26-floor hotel in April of 2009 the roof and the entryway looked perfect.”

To discover more uses of composite slate and shake tiles on commercial structures, visit Commercial Projects Rely on Polymer Roofing – Part I and Commercial Projects Rely on Polymer Roofing – Part II.

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DaVinci Roofs: An Answer to Many Prayers

Coast-to-coast you'll find DaVinci polymer roofing tiles atop many different churches. While each church recognizes the benefits of the long-lasting synthetic roofing tiles, perhaps the churches that appreciate them the most are the oldest ones.

“This simulated slate roofing product truly looks like the original slate tile that was placed on our church and chapel more than 75 years ago," says Father Peter Grover, OMV with St. Clement Eucharist Shrine in Boston. "The Bellaforté product allowed us to preserve both the historical look and feel of our facilities. We also gained the advantage that these polymer tiles resist fire, high winds and severe weather. That gives us all peace-of-mind knowing that our church facility and seminary are protected."

In Jacksonville, Oregon, the town's Historic Architectural Review Committee approved a DaVinci Roofscapes shake shingle roof to replace the decaying cedar shakes on the roof at the historic First Presbyterian Church of Jacksonville, which opened in 1881. A Tahoe blend featuring five shades of brown in multi-width composite shake tiles provides the church with the authentic cedar look they desired.

"Our entire town is on the national historic register and we had to receive permission from the Historic Architectural Review Committee to use the DaVinci roofing product," says Dave Harter, elder at the First Presbyterian Church of Jacksonville. "Because the product looked so authentic to real cedar shakes and had a better fire rating than wood shingles, the committee made the decision for the first time ever to allow polymer roofing tiles on a structure in our city."

The DaVinci lightweight roofing materials used for both churches are Class 4 impact rated and have been rated Class A for fire retardance. The fake slate and fake cedar shake roofing materials have also achieved the highest ratings for straight line wind testing at 110 mph and have passed testing for extreme weather conditions.

Backed by a 50-year limited lifetime warranty, DaVinci plastic roofing materials resist insects, fungus, algae, mold, cracking, fading and curling.  

Looking for more details on how imitation slate shingles are used to create eco friendly roofs? Then visit Historic Church Gets High-Tech Polymer Roof and Historic Peterson House Gets DaVinci Polymer Roof.

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From the Architects Corner: Featured Projects

The great thing about this blog is that we can regularly feature projects so that we almost always have a project to point to when somebody calls and says, "Do you have any examples of ____________ (fill in the blank) that you can show me?". So we can definitely check the next four Featured Projects off the list - a historic clock tower, a residential project using the very colorful Vineyard Blend, a roof in Oklahoma that needs to stand up to the highest wind and impact standards, and a Bellaforté Shake roof that was a natural cedar shake tear off project. 

Featured Project - Vail, CO

Click here to read how this luxury roof tile has transformed the Vail Village skyline. 

Featured Project - Des Moines, IA

Click here to read about this project and the phases it took to complete the job. 

Featured Project - Greenwood Village, CO

Click here to read about this natural shake tear off and re-roof project in Colorado. 

Featured Project - Oklahoma

Click here to read about this impact resistant roof in Oklahoma. 

To see more of our projects, visit our media room and browse through our project profiles.

Happy Friday, Architects! 

 

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Museum Rooftops

History is repeating itself ... up on the roofs of museums across the nation.

As older roofs fail on noteworthy historical projects, preservationists have found the answer of recreating natural slate and shake roofs in the form of man-made polymer roofing tiles from DaVinci Roofscapes.

More durable than natural products, the synthetic roofing tiles from DaVinci resist fire, impact, high winds and the punishing weather conditions brought on by Mother Nature. In Durango, Colo., the milled wood roof shingles on the 1880s Peterson House were so worn by time and weather that they had simply crumbled apart. As part of ongoing restoration efforts of the historic structure in 2011, the team at Animas Museum added DaVinci Fancy Shake roofing tile in the Mountain color to replicate the look of the original roof.

“We love the roof because it is ‘spot on’ for the period and the building,” says Carolyn Bowra, director of Animas Museum. “The mission at our museum is to keep La Plata County history and culture alive for present and future generations. DaVinci Roofscapes has certainly supported this effort and made it possible for the Peterson House to have a new life.”

Across the country in Chicago, another museum also sports a DaVinci composite roof.

After a proud history that includes serving as a horse stable during the 1893 World’s Fair, the Roundhouse at DuSable Museum in Chicago has now been restored and is topped by a DaVinci Multi-Width slate roof.

Part of the first African American museum campus in the United States, the 66,000-square foot Roundhouse and the adjoining buildings are home to a library, café, galleries, technology and language lab, museum store and educational spaces. The building is considered one of the main contributing features to the recognition of Washington Park when it was designated in 2004 on the National Register of Historic Places.

“We realized at the start of the project that the first priority was to support the historic restoration of the building,” says Sarah Delezen, senior project manager for the Alter Group. “The DaVinci roofing tiles look amazing on the Roundhouse. The structure’s original roof was made of slate, so we were pleased that these polymer tiles have the texture and subtle variations of color that make them appear historically accurate. The Castle Gray blend of colors in the roof perfectly offsets the copper gutters on this structure.”

For more information on these projects, visit Historic Peterson House Gets DaVinci Polymer Roof and Historic DuSable Museum Gets New Polymer Roof - Part I

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