Historic Architectural Review Committee in Oregon Approves Polymer Roof for Church

Founded in 1852, the old mining town of Jacksonville, Oregon prides itself on keeping its city structures historically accurate. So, it was welcome news when the town's Historic Architectural Review Committee approved a DaVinci Roofscapes polymer shake roof to replace the decaying cedar shake shingles on the roof at the historic First Presbyterian Church of Jacksonville, which opened in 1881.

"Our entire town is on the national historic register and we had to receive permission from the Historic Architectural Review Committee to use the DaVinci roofing product," says Dave Harter, elder at the First Presbyterian Church of Jacksonville. "Because the product looked so authentic to real cedar shakes and had a better fire rating than wood shingles, the committee made the decision for the first time ever to allow polymer roofing tiles on a structure in our city."

The DaVinci Shake roofing products chosen for the First Presbyterian Church of Jacksonville are Class 4 impact rated and has a Class A fire rating. The roofing materials have also achieved the highest ratings for straight line wind testing at 110 mph and have passed testing for extreme weather conditions. A Tahoe blend featuring five shades of brown in multi-width roofing tiles provides the church with the authentic cedar look they desired in a fake cedar shake shingle.

Installed in 2008 by Hoag Roofing in Central Point, Ore., the roof has held up extremely well for the past five years. "We would recommend this DaVinci product to any other church looking for a durable, authentic-looking roofing material," says Harter. "Best of all, with its 50-year roof limited warranty, we don't have to worry about reroofing our church again for many decades to come!"

For more information on churches with DaVinci roofs visit Churches Thankful for Roofs Overhead         


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