DaVinci Roofing Tops Off Historic Projects

Over the years we’ve shared dozens of stories on this blog site related to how DaVinci composite roofing has been used to top off historic structures. National Preservation Month in June is the ideal time to shine a spotlight on some of our favorite historic projects that have been re-roofed with our synthetic slate and composite shake roofing materials.

 

synthetic slate

Salmon River Lighthouse

Selected for its durability against strong winds and severe weather, a DaVinci Multi-Width Slate roofing now tops off the Salmon River Lighthouse in Pulaski, N.Y. Built in 1838, the stone structure is on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. (See Historic Lighthouse Gets Durable New DaVinci Roof)

 

custom synthetic roof

Chapel at Dayton Veterans’ Administration Medical Center

Built more than 145 years ago, the chapel at Dayton Veteran’s Administration Medical Center now has a DaVinci slate roof overhead in a unique design pattern to replicate its original slate roof. The Ohio chapel used both tan and black tiles to re-create a large cross design with a star-studded border on the roof. (SeeĀ Dayton Veterans Administration Medical Center Gets a New Roof!)

 

synthetic shake

Douglas House

In 1853 the Douglas House in Waukegan, Illinois was constructed to replicate a style the homeowner, Robert Douglas, was fond of from his birthplace in England. After cedar roofing failed, the city invested in a DaVinci composite shake roof to give renewed life to the structure. (See Composite Shakes Replace Real Cedar on Historic Home)

 

synthetic Cedar Shakesimulated shake roofing

Jean Bonnet Tavern

Located in Bedford, Pennsylvania, the Jean Bonnet Tavern was constructed in the 1760s and is on the National Register of Historic Places. The historic structure received a new DaVinci simulated shake roof several years ago that replicates the tavern’s original roof. (SeeĀ DaVinci Shake on a Bed and Breakfast)

 

simulated slate roof

The Roundhouse at DuSable Museum

Following a unique history that includes serving as a horse stable during the 1893 World’s Fair, the Roundhouse at DuSable Museum in Chicago now boasts a DaVinci Multi-Width Slate roof. The new roof replicates the original slate roof. Part of the first African American museum campus in the United States, the Roundhouse will soon be home to a library, galleries, technology and language lab and educational spaces. (See A Day … Or Night … at the Museum)

 

 

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